One person dead after being ejected from vehicle in Fayetteville crash, investigation closes road

One person is dead after being ejected from their vehicle in a Saturday night Fayetteville crash.

  • White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again
    Yahoo News

    White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again

    The White House continued on Thursday to promote the use of hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug that President Trump and some of his supporters have held out as a treatment for the coronavirus, against the advice of the Food and Drug Administration and in the face of studies that have shown it can be harmful in some cases. Routinely touted by prominent conservative allies of the president, including primetime Fox News anchor Laura Ingraham, it has been denounced by members of the medical establishment as an unproven therapy that poses the risk of potentially fatal heart complications. The FDA recommends that COVID-19 patients, if they choose to use it, do so only in a hospital or under medical supervision in a clinical trial.

  • Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments
    The Independent

    ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments

    A mayor in Mississippi is facing fierce backlash and calls to resign after saying that he “didn't see anything unreasonable” about the death of George Floyd. Mr Floyd, who was black, died while in police custody in Minneapolis after a white officer was filmed pinned him to the ground by his neck for a prolonged period of time. In the footage, Floyd can be heard saying “I can't breathe” to officers multiple times.

  • Minnesota Riots Hurt Klobuchar’s VP Nomination Prospects, According to Biden Ally
    National Review

    Minnesota Riots Hurt Klobuchar’s VP Nomination Prospects, According to Biden Ally

    The ongoing riots in Minnesota hurt Senator Amy Klobuchar's prospects for Democratic nomination as vice president, House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D., S.C.) said on Friday. Klobuchar declined to bring charges against multiple Minneapolis police officers involved in shootings over the course of her seven-year tenure as attorney for Hennepin County. Minneapolis has seen four days of riots after resident George Floyd, an African-American man, died following his arrest at the hands of white officers.

  • Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 
    Yahoo News

    Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

    While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says contaminated surfaces are not the main way the virus is transmitted, the agency hasn't ruled surfaces out as a possible mode of infection. “If you want a reliable way to prevent yourself from getting the coronavirus, worry less about the surfaces you touch, and worry more about how frequently you wash your hands,” says Dr. Dara Kass, a Yahoo News Medical Contributor and associate professor of emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. Confusion over how the virus is transmitted was reignited last week when the CDC edited the “How COVID-19 Spreads” page on their COVID-19 website to mention contaminated surfaces and objects under a new heading entitled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.”

  • 'No mask — no entry': New York Gov. Cuomo says he'll sign an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people who won't wear masks
    Business Insider

    'No mask — no entry': New York Gov. Cuomo says he'll sign an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people who won't wear masks

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo plans to sign an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people who won't wear masks. New York governor Andrew Cuomo will sign an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to  people not wearing a mask, he said Thursday, as face coverings become a political sparring point amid the coronavirus pandemic. "No mask - No entry," he said on Twitter during his daily press briefing in New York City.

  • Well-preserved Roman mosaic unearthed in Italian vineyard
    Associated Press

    Well-preserved Roman mosaic unearthed in Italian vineyard

    Archaeologists have briefly revealed a well-preserved mosaic floor of an ancient Roman villa first discovered almost a century ago near the northern Italian city of Verona. The mosaic in bright shades of red, pink, orange, purple and yellow appeared to be ''in a good state of conservation,'' from what archaeologists observed after gingerly digging a trench between vineyards in the hills of Valpolicella, Gianni de Zuccato, the official in charge of archaeology in Verona province, said Friday. Mosaics revealing the site of an ancient villa were first discovered in 1922.

  • IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments
    NBC News

    IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments

    A Polish prosecutor has charged an IKEA manager with religious discrimination for firing an employee who called homosexuality "an abomination" on the company's internal website. The employee at IKEA's Krakow store was fired last year after quoting passages from the Bible referring to homosexuality on the company's intranet and refusing to remove his comments, a spokesman for the Warsaw prosecutor's office said. "As an employer, we will provide all the help and support to our charged employee," said a spokeswoman from Ingka Group, which owns most IKEA stores including those in Poland.

  • Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed
    AFP

    Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

    Israeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.

  • Hong Kong officials say Trump 'completely wrong' to end city's special status
    Reuters

    Hong Kong officials say Trump 'completely wrong' to end city's special status

    Hong Kong officials lashed out on Saturday at moves by U.S. President Donald Trump to strip the city of its special status in a bid to punish China for imposing national security laws on the global financial hub. Speaking hours after Trump said the city no longer warranted economic privileges and that some officials could face sanctions, security minister John Lee told reporters that Hong Kong could not be threatened and would push ahead with the new laws. "I don't think they will succeed in using any means to threaten the (Hong Kong) government, because we believe what we are doing is right," Lee said.

  • Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical
    Yahoo News

    Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical

    Pentagon leaders expressed strong confidence Thursday that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by January, and perhaps as early as this fall — claims that were met with skepticism by scientific experts. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said that he and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar “will be co-chairing Operation Warp Speed,” the effort by the administration of President Trump to produce 300 million vaccine doses by January. “I'm confident that we will be able to deliver a vaccine at scale in time” by partnering with other government agencies and the private sector, Esper said.

  • Cemeteries braced for surge in Covid-19 dead as Mexico readies to reopen
    The Guardian

    Cemeteries braced for surge in Covid-19 dead as Mexico readies to reopen

    Yet as Mexico's daily death toll rises to become one of the highest in the world – a record 501 fatalities were reported on Tuesday alone – the country is simultaneously preparing to reopen and weathering a politically charged battle over the true scale of the crisis. We're doing well, the pandemic has been tamed,” Mexico's populist president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, claimed on Thursday as he announced he would resume touring the country when a period of nationwide quarantine was wound down next week. Alejandro Macías, a leading infectious diseases specialist, said he understood and supported the need to plot out a return to some kind of normality for Mexico's 129 million citizens.

  • Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal
    The Telegraph

    Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal

    The governments of Denmark and Norway have cut Sweden out of a deal allowing each other's tourists to travel freely between the two countries — citing their Nordic neighbour's higher levels of coronavirus infection. The deal, announced at parallel press conferences in Oslo and Copenhagen on Friday afternoon, showed Sweden has failed in its diplomatic efforts to be included in the first stage of a Nordic travel bubble. Under the deal, people from Denmark will from June 15 be allowed to enter Norway without needing to quarantine, while tourists from Norway will be able to enter Denmark, so long as they have booked accommodation for at least six days.

  • It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper
    INSIDER

    It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper

    Several women named Amy Cooper have found themselves on the receiving end of online hate this week. People have mistaken those women for the Amy Cooper who called the police on a Central Park bird-watcher. Two women named Amy Cooper told Insider that when the messages started rolling in, they weren't yet familiar with the now-infamous incident.

  • The founder of a contact tracing firm that's fielded 80,000 job applications in 5 weeks describes what he's looking for in an applicant
    Business Insider

    The founder of a contact tracing firm that's fielded 80,000 job applications in 5 weeks describes what he's looking for in an applicant

    Empathy, compassion, and being able to talk to people in times of crisis are crucial for contact tracers CONTRACE comes into play by helping to identify and screen people who want to work as contract tracers and then connecting them with organizations that are building contact-tracing teams. "People who are in close contact with someone infected with COVID-19 are more likely to get infected themselves, and then also potentially infect others," Waters said. "But [by] identifying close contacts and encouraging them to self-quarantine, you can use a targeted approach that helps prevent further spread of the virus."

  • NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program
    Associated Press

    NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program

    The U.S. National Security Agency says the same Russian military hacking group that interfered in the 2016 presidential election and unleashed a devastating malware attack the following year has been exploiting a major email server program since last August or earlier. The timing of the agency's advisory Thursday was unusual considering that the critical vulnerability in the Exim Mail Transfer Agent — which mostly runs on Unix-type operating systems — was identified 11 months ago, when a patch was issued. Exim is so widely used — though far less known than such commercial alternatives as Microsoft's proprietary Exchange — that some companies and government agencies that run it may still not have patched the vulnerability, said Jake Williams, president of Rendition Infosec and a former U.S. government hacker.

  • Reps. Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley introduce resolution condemning  police brutality after George Floyd death
    USA TODAY

    Reps. Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley introduce resolution condemning police brutality after George Floyd death

    WASHINGTON –Reps. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., introduced a resolution Friday asking the House of Representatives to condemn "police brutality, racial profiling and the excessive use of force" following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor by police officers. Floyd, a black man, died in Minneapolis police custody this week after a white officer pinned him to the ground under his knee.

  • Joe Biden plans to name running mate around August 1
    CBS News Videos

    Joe Biden plans to name running mate around August 1

    Joe Biden says he hopes to announce his running mate around August 1. CBS News 2020 campaign reporter Bo Erickson joins CBSN to talk about the latest from the Democrat's campaign.

  • The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means for Business in the Global Financial Hub
    Time

    The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means for Business in the Global Financial Hub

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Wednesday that Hong Kong was no longer sufficiently autonomous from mainland China — an assessment that could threaten the city's trading relationship with the U.S. and deal a blow to both American and Chinese companies operating there. The news comes following Beijing's decision late last week to draw up a national security law for Hong Kong. The move came after Hong Kong's Legislative Council failed in its obligations to enact such a law since the former British colony was handed back to China in 1997.

  • China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy
    Reuters

    China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy

    Chinese civil aviation authorities plan to extend until June 30 their curbs on international flights to contain the spread of the coronavirus, the U.S. embassy in Beijing said in a travel advisory on Friday. China has drastically cut such flights since March to allay concerns over infections brought by arriving passengers. A so-called "Five One" policy allows mainland carriers to fly just one flight a week on one route to any country and foreign airlines to operate just one flight a week to China.

  • Declassified calls show Flynn discussing sanctions with Russian envoy
    NBC News

    Declassified calls show Flynn discussing sanctions with Russian envoy

    In an extraordinary disclosure of U.S. intelligence materials, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe released newly declassified records on Friday of intercepted calls between former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former Russian Ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak. The detailed call summaries from December 2016, in the weeks before President Donald Trump took office, offer the clearest public evidence to date that Flynn indeed discussed sanctions specifically during their calls, despite Flynn telling both the FBI and Vice President Mike Pence that they did not.

  • Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN
    The Telegraph

    Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

    Five British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya's renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar's opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military.

  • Britain pushing US to form 5G club of nations to cut out Huawei
    AFP

    Britain pushing US to form 5G club of nations to cut out Huawei

    Britain said Friday it was pushing the United States to form a club of 10 nations that could develop its own 5G technology and reduce dependence on China's controversial telecoms giant Huawei. The issue is expected to feature at a G7 summit that US President Donald Trump will host next month against the backdrop of a fierce confrontation with China that has been exacerbated by a global blame game over the spread of the novel coronavirus. Britain has allowed the Chinese global leader in 5G technology to build up to 35 percent of the infrastructure necessary to roll out its new speedy data network.

  • The anti-vax movement is using growing hesitation around the coronavirus vaccine to attract more people
    Business Insider

    The anti-vax movement is using growing hesitation around the coronavirus vaccine to attract more people

    Top scientific experts have said an effective, widely-used vaccine is the "only hope" at eliminating the coronavirus and achieving herd immunity quickly. As scientists around the world race to develop a vaccine to fight the novel coronavirus, some Americans are still skeptical. A poll published May 27 found that only about half of Americans would get a coronavirus vaccine, should one become available, while 31% were unsure.

  • New report alleges killings, mass detentions in Ethiopia
    Associated Press

    New report alleges killings, mass detentions in Ethiopia

    A new report by the rights group Amnesty International accuses Ethiopia's security forces of extrajudicial killings and mass detentions even as the country's reformist prime minister was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The report issued Friday says security forces killed at least 25 people in 2019 in the East Guji and West Guji zones of the restive Oromia region amid suspicions of supporting a rebel group, the Oromo Liberation Army, and a once-exiled opposition group. And at least 10,000 people under suspicion were detained between January and September, with most “subjected to brutal beatings."