Patrick Maroon pens emotional goodbye to hometown St. Louis Blues

Ailish Forfar
NHL Editor
Hometown boy Patrick Maroon penned an emotional goodbye to St. Louis. (Getty)

When the St. Louis Blues won their first Stanley Cup in franchise history this year, fans were treated to multiple storylines that made this feat one of the most memorable, and heartwarming moments in recent sports history.

There’s the meteoric rise from dead last in January, to champions in June. There’s the 1982 song Gloria that became the soundtrack to success and now will forever be associated with the team. There’s everyone favourite fan 11-year-old Laila Anderson, who signified the strength and resilience of her favourite club.

And then there was seeing Pat Maroon, who signed a one-year deal with his hometown Blues on July 10th, 2018, hoist the Stanley Cup.

On Saturday, the Tampa Bay Lightning signed the free-agent forward to a one-year, $900k deal, meaning Maroon’s time wearing the Blue Note had officially come to an end.

The 31-year-old went to Twitter shortly after to pen an emotional thank you to the city of St. Louis and Blues organization.

It was Maroon’s childhood dream to play for the Blues so you could imagine the feeling on June 12th was something indescribable. After not being offered an extension in the offseason, saying farewell and moving on is bittersweet.

Maroon sums up his emotions as such: “through all the ups and many downs, the ending of my story here couldn’t be more perfect.”

He’ll be fondly remembered in the city of St. Louis for his heart, his relentlessness, and for that Game 7 double overtime winner against the Dallas Stars in round two of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

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