Philadelphia Arts Programs Fighting Another Uphill Battle With Proposed Budget Cuts

Trang Do reports.

  • China detains professor who criticised Xi over coronavirus
    AFP

    China detains professor who criticised Xi over coronavirus

    Chinese authorities on Monday detained a law professor who published essays criticising President Xi Jinping over the coronavirus pandemic and accusing him of ruling "tyrannically", according to friends of the man. Xu Zhangrun, a rare outspoken critic of the government in China's heavily censored academia, was taken from his home in suburban Beijing by more than 20 people, one of his friends said on condition of anonymity. Xu published an essay in February blaming the culture of deception and censorship fostered by Xi for the spread of the coronavirus in China.

  • Disappointing photos show how small Mount Rushmore is in real life
    INSIDER

    Disappointing photos show how small Mount Rushmore is in real life

    But Borglum decided to carve four presidents to make the monument more of a national draw. But in real life, the monument doesn't loom as large as it may seem in photos. Aside from seeing the sculpture itself, the national monument also has hiking trails, a visitor's center, cafe, Sculptor's Studio, kid's play area, and the Lakota, Nakota and Dakota Heritage Village highlighting the thousands of years of Native American history in the area.

  • McConnell opens door to more coronavirus stimulus checks for low-income Americans
    NBC News

    McConnell opens door to more coronavirus stimulus checks for low-income Americans

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Monday that the next round of coronavirus legislation could include an additional round of stimulus checks aimed at helping low-income Americans. Asked at one of three public events in Kentucky whether the relief bill would include more direct payments, McConnell said it "could well." Many of them work in the hospitality industry.

  • Seven men arrested after shouting racist insults and doing Nazi salutes at black family on Oregon beach, police say
    The Independent

    Seven men arrested after shouting racist insults and doing Nazi salutes at black family on Oregon beach, police say

    Seven men have been arrested after an alleged racist incident on the Fourth of July in an Oregon beach town. Police said that the men allegedly yelled racial slurs at a black family and used Nazi salutes while people spent Independence Day on the beach in Lincoln City, southwest of Portland. The men have been arrested on suspicion of charges including riot, disorderly conduct, interfering with police and possession of illegal fireworks, according to The Oregonian.

  • The WHO changed its coronavirus timeline to say it got its first report about the virus on the internet, not from Chinese authorities
    Business Insider

    The WHO changed its coronavirus timeline to say it got its first report about the virus on the internet, not from Chinese authorities

    reported last month that China delayed the release of critical information about the outbreak to the public and the WHO for several days, and waited more than a week to release the virus' genome — actions that likely delayed the development of vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. The AP also reported in April that top Chinese leaders had known for six days in January that the coronavirus could become a deadly pandemic, but told the world the virus posed a low risk to people and could not be transmitted between humans. At the same time, the WHO, which relies on countries to provide their own data, took China at its word and offered the same advice — which has since proven to be wrong.

  • Predominantly Black armed protesters march through Confederate memorial park in Georgia
    Yahoo News Video

    Predominantly Black armed protesters march through Confederate memorial park in Georgia

    A predominantly Black group of heavily armed protesters marched through Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta on Saturday, calling for removal of the giant Confederate rock carving at the site that civil rights activists consider a monument to racism.

  • Can’t find Clorox wipes? Here’s what to buy instead
    USA TODAY

    Can’t find Clorox wipes? Here’s what to buy instead

    While new data suggests that catching coronaviruses from surfaces is unlikely, this is especially true when it comes to cleaning wipes, which topped the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) list of disinfectants that can help protect against COVID-19. Lysol spray and Clorox wipes could even potentially be in low supply through the end of June. Whatever you do, don't panic—you can still get your hands on enough cleaning supplies for the whole family—and skip the big crowds in stores—if you shop them at these online retailers.

  • Frederick Douglass statue vandalized in Rochester park
    Associated Press

    Frederick Douglass statue vandalized in Rochester park

    A statue of abolitionist Frederick Douglass was ripped from its base in Rochester on the anniversary of one of his most famous speeches, delivered in that city in 1852. Police said the statue of Douglass was taken on Sunday from Maplewood Park, a site along the Underground Railroad where Douglass and Harriet Tubman helped shuttle slaves to freedom. In Rochester on July 5, 1852, Douglass gave the speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July,” in which he called the celebration of liberty a sham in a nation that enslaves and oppresses its Black citizens.

  • South Korea rejects US extradition request over child abuse website
    BBC

    South Korea rejects US extradition request over child abuse website

    A South Korean court has denied a US extradition request for the man behind one of the world's largest child sexual abuse websites. Son Jong-woo, who ran the site Welcome to Video, served 18 months in South Korea for producing and distributing indecent images of children. Following his initial release in April, Son was taken back into custody after a warrant was issued for US extradition.

  • Regeneron COVID-19 treatment enters final stage trials
    AFP

    Regeneron COVID-19 treatment enters final stage trials

    The pharmaceutical firm Regeneron on Monday announced it was entering the late stages of its human clinical trials investigating a drug to both treat and prevent COVID-19. The drug, called REGN-COV2, is a combination of two antibodies that block the coronavirus' "spike protein" which it uses to invade human cells. The company is moving to the final Phase 3 stage of a trial to determine if its drug can prevent infection among people recently exposed to the virus -- for example through a person in their household.

  • Moscow Has a Field Day With Trump’s Fireworks at Mt. Russia-More
    The Daily Beast

    Moscow Has a Field Day With Trump’s Fireworks at Mt. Russia-More

    Kremlin-controlled Russian state media set out to tickle U.S. President Trump's fragile ego amid falling ratings after his blustery appearance at Mount Rushmore on Friday. Mentioning that the American head of state had previously toyed with the idea he might be featured alongside Washington, Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt, and Lincoln, Russia's premier state media channel Rossiya-1 aired a graphic of Trump's mug right up there on the mountain beside them. Given the frequent allusions on Russian state media to Trump as Moscow's friend, even Moscow's “agent” in the White House, maybe the Kremlin would like to see the enormous monument renamed Mount Russia-More.

  • As divisions threaten America, the pressure to cancel presidents is dangerous
    USA TODAY Opinion

    As divisions threaten America, the pressure to cancel presidents is dangerous

    Princeton University has decided to remove former President Woodrow Wilson's name from its school of Public and International Affairs, citing his “racist thinking and policies.” Looking solely through the lens of race relations, the case against Wilson is clear. In his 1912 run for the White House, Wilson would warm up the crowds with racial jokes that today would be unprintable. Gazing back across the long century since Wilson was in office shows the progress we have made as a country.

  • Ghislaine Maxwell moved to Brooklyn detention centre ahead of bail hearing
    The Independent

    Ghislaine Maxwell moved to Brooklyn detention centre ahead of bail hearing

    Ghislaine Maxwell has been moved to a New York jail ahead of a bail hearing on Friday, where a court will decide if she remains in detention ahead of a trial in which she faces charges of facilitating the sexual abuse of minors. Prosecutors allege that Ms Maxwell, 58, lured and groomed underage girls so that they could be abused by her former boyfriend and associate, the late financier Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein was arrested in July last year for the sex trafficking of minors in Florida and New York.

  • NASA's powerful Hubble space telescope has beamed back a striking photo of a 'fluffy' galaxy with a ghostly, empty center
    Business Insider

    NASA's powerful Hubble space telescope has beamed back a striking photo of a 'fluffy' galaxy with a ghostly, empty center

    By contrast, other spiral galaxies — including the Milky Way — have more distinct arms where stars and gas are compressed. Hubble is NASA's strongest telescope — but not for long NASA launched Hubble into Earth's orbit in April 1990. Since then, the telescope has discovered new planets, revealed strange galaxies, and provided new insights into the nature of black holes.

  • This Chinese Submarine Could Drop a Nuclear Weapon on America
    The National Interest

    This Chinese Submarine Could Drop a Nuclear Weapon on America

    Here's What You Need To Remember: The nuclear submarine club is indeed a highly exclusive club—and those with nuclear ballistic missiles even more so. China's Type 094, or Jin-class nuclear submarines are capable, but they may be tools for promoting national prestige rather than true nuclear deterrence. The Type 094, or Jin-class as it is also known, is operated by the People's Liberation Army Submarine Force.

  • Mexican military finds plane in flames and truck carrying drugs
    Reuters

    Mexican military finds plane in flames and truck carrying drugs

    Mexican military officials said on Sunday they discovered a small plane from South America in flames after it made an illegal landing on the Yucatan Peninsula possibly carrying hundreds of kilos of drugs. Nearby, military officials said they also found a truck carrying drugs that appeared to be cocaine, packaged into 13 parcels weighting 30 kg (66 pounds) each, and likely coming from the plane. With an estimated value of more than 109 million pesos ($4.9 million), the loss would have a "significant" impact on criminal organizations, said a statement from the Mexican military.

  • Olson Kundig’s Latest Design Embraces Its Hawaiian Habitat
    Architectural Digest

    Olson Kundig’s Latest Design Embraces Its Hawaiian Habitat

    On a stunning lava rock field site in Kona, this stunning home seems to hover over the landscape as a series of pavilions Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Associated Press

    China criticizes US joint carrier drills in South China Sea

    China on Monday accused the U.S. of flexing its military muscles in the South China Sea by conducting joint exercises with two U.S. aircraft carrier groups in the strategic waterway. Foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said the exercises were performed “totally out of ulterior motives” and undermined stability in the area. “Against such a backdrop, the U.S. deliberately dispatched massive forces to conduct large-scale military exercises in the relevant waters of the South China Sea to flex its military muscle," Zhao said at a daily briefing.

  • Surge in NYC shootings fuels police reform debate
    AFP

    Surge in NYC shootings fuels police reform debate

    New York reeled from a spate of holiday weekend shootings Monday, with police fueling controversy by partially attributing them to reforms undertaken following the death in custody of George Floyd. The Big Apple was rocked by 45 shootings -- which resulted in 11 deaths -- over the long July 4th weekend, up from just 16 shootings for the same period in 2019. Terence Monahan, the NYPD's highest-ranking uniformed officer, said "tremendous animosity" shown towards officers following the recent Black Lives Matter protests had contributed by lowering police morale.

  • Trump's misreading the map, looking for Electoral College votes in some of the wrong places
    NBC News

    Trump's misreading the map, looking for Electoral College votes in some of the wrong places

    If November's election were held this week, polling averages suggest, Joe Biden would sweep President Donald Trump in all six states Trump carried by less than 5 points in 2016: Arizona, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Biden is also running highly competitively in the four states Trump carried by 5 to 10 points last time: Georgia, Iowa, Ohio and Texas. That would amount to a Biden landslide of a magnitude of 334 to 413 electoral votes (270 are required to win).

  • Applebee’s employee dies in parking lot while celebrating July 4, Texas police say
    Miami Herald

    Applebee’s employee dies in parking lot while celebrating July 4, Texas police say

    A Fourth of July celebration in Texas came to a tragic end when a woman fell from a moving vehicle in an Applebee's parking lot and died early Sunday, officials say. Around 12:30 a.m., police said a 24-year-old Applebee's employee and some of her coworkers decided to set off fireworks in the Houston restaurant's parking lot after closing for the night, KHOU reported. The 24-year-old woman and an 18-year-old friend stood on the rear bumper, KPRC reported.

  • Breonna Taylor’s Death Was Connected to Shady Louisville Gentrification Plan: Lawsuit
    The Daily Beast

    Breonna Taylor’s Death Was Connected to Shady Louisville Gentrification Plan: Lawsuit

    Breonna Taylor, a Kentucky EMT worker fatally shot in her home in March, died as a result of a politically-driven police operation “to clear out” a Louisville street to make way for a multi-million gentrification plan, a lawsuit filed by the 26-year-old's family states. Taylor, who worked for two local hospitals, and her boyfriend were asleep in their apartment on March 13 when three officers executed a “no-knock” search warrant looking for a suspected drug dealer who lived in a different part of town. Taylor was shot eight times, spurring an FBI investigation and unleashing a wave of protests alongside the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia.

  • What the top 25 colleges and universities in the US have said about their plans to reopen in fall 2020, from postponing the semester to offering more remote coursework
    Business Insider

    What the top 25 colleges and universities in the US have said about their plans to reopen in fall 2020, from postponing the semester to offering more remote coursework

    US universities began shifting to remote learning in light of the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020. Here's what the top 25 US colleges and universities have discussed for fall 2020 reopening plans so far. To inform our list, Business Insider used education research firm Quacquarelli Symonds' first-ever US specific ranking of the best colleges and universities in 2020.

  • North Korea Would Use Lethal 'Swarm' Attacks to Fight
    The National Interest

    North Korea Would Use Lethal 'Swarm' Attacks to Fight

    Key Point: North Korea could potentially prove devastating by conducting quick surprise attacks with flotillas of boats to overwhelm the defenses of enemy ships. If South Korea goes to war with its northern neighbor, one of the threats that it will face is swarms of small naval craft armed with missiles and torpedoes. And how is South Korea is preparing to defeat them?

  • Las Vegas' Nobu Hotel at Caesars Palace reopens amid COVID-19 pandemic
    USA TODAY

    Las Vegas' Nobu Hotel at Caesars Palace reopens amid COVID-19 pandemic

    LAS VEGAS – Nobu Hotel Caesars Palace has reopened. The Caesars Entertainment property is the seventh to open since Nevada lifted a COVID-19 shutdown that lasted almost three months, reports the Reno Gazette Journal, which is a part of the USA TODAY Network. As customer interest in visiting Las Vegas continues to increase, we remain committed to creating memorable experiences for guests at our premier boutique hotel with enhanced health and safety protocols,” said Gary Selesner, regional president of Caesars Entertainment, in a statement.