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Female hysteria

You can of course thank Sigmund Freud for illuminating or stigmatizing the better half in a condition called female hysteria. "The pejorative [definition] would be emotional excess,” Baker explains, “women who could not manage their emotions and exhibited conversion disorders." Symptoms included fainting, nervousness, muscle spasms, loss of physical control.

The diagnosis lingered through the second-half of the 50th century, and testified to how so much of American psychology was tied to Freudian theory. One of the most popular treatments for hysteria was hypnosis, as demonstrated by French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot (above), although he would later question his own theories. Freud studied under Charcot and would even name his firstborn, but the student would later depart from the master and dispute the neurological, aka physical, origins of female hysteria.

"Madness" no more: How definitions of mental illness have changed over the years

By Vera H-C Chan and Claudine Zap


In 1952, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders weighed in at a wispy 50 pages. In 1994, DSM-IV numbered 943 pages. The DSM-5 will actually be less than that — still, when comparing the versions, "one thing you're struck with right away is the increase of diagnostic categories," says David Baker, director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology at the University of Akron. "It's largely a kind of a mirror on the culture... It's not purely objective."



Not surprisingly, well before the DSM came into existence, respected intellectuals were espousing psychological theories on why females went into hysterics, the sickness that made slaves want to run from their masters, and the upper-class ailment triggered by hard work and social upheaval. Here’s a look at disorders, past and present, that fell out of fashion, got caught up in other illnesses, or changed its name.

  • Romney speculates Turkey called Trump's bluff: 'Are we so weak and inept?'
    Yahoo News

    Romney speculates Turkey called Trump's bluff: 'Are we so weak and inept?'

    In an impassioned speech on the Senate floor Thursday, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, blasted President Trump's decision to pull troops from defensive positions in Syria, and brought up the possibility that “Turkey may have called America's bluff” in an exchange between Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. “Are we so weak and inept diplomatically that Turkey forced the hand of the United States of America? Turkey?” Romney said.

  • 2020 Vision: Hillary Clinton thinks Russia will back Tulsi Gabbard to help Trump stay in power
    Yahoo News

    2020 Vision: Hillary Clinton thinks Russia will back Tulsi Gabbard to help Trump stay in power

    Reminder: There are 108 days until the Iowa caucuses and 382 days until the 2020 presidential election. 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said this week that Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, is likely being groomed by Moscow as a third-party candidate for the 2020 race. In an interview on the podcast of former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe, Clinton expressed her concerns about possible Russian interference in 2020.

  • Atomwaffen Division’s Washington State Cell Leader Stripped of Arsenal in U.S., Banned from Canada
    The Daily Beast

    Atomwaffen Division’s Washington State Cell Leader Stripped of Arsenal in U.S., Banned from Canada

    Kaleb James Cole, the 24-year-old leader of Atomwaffen Division's Washington State Cell stripped of his firearms by a “red-flag law” late last month, was deported and banned for life from Canada earlier this year, according to court records, which also showed that he had been previously interrogated by American border agents about his extremist views. Cole, a National Socialist black metal enthusiast who goes by the alias “Khimaere,” was first identified as a member of Atomwaffen Division in a 2018 ProPublica investigation. Atomwaffen Division is an underground neo-Nazi guerrilla organization which had 23 chapters throughout the United States as of mid-2018.

  • Judges grapple with misconduct claims in Jodi Arias case
    Associated Press

    Judges grapple with misconduct claims in Jodi Arias case

    Appellate judges who will decide whether to reverse Jodi Arias' murder conviction in the gruesome 2008 killing of her former boyfriend grappled Thursday with who was responsible for whipping up publicity during the salacious trial and whether alleged misconduct by a prosecutor should cause the verdict to be tossed. A lawyer for Arias told the Arizona Court of Appeals that prosecutor Juan Martinez improperly questioned witnesses, ignored rulings on evidence, courted publicity and made an unfounded accusation that an expert on her defense team had an inappropriate relationship with Arias. Terry Crist, a lawyer for the Arizona attorney general's office, told the judges that he believes Martinez may have occasionally violated court rules, but none of his actions should lead to a reversal of the conviction.

  • INSIDER

    Israel, Russia, and the US are in a diplomatic standoff over a 26-year-old woman smuggling 9 and a half grams of marijuana

    Facebook/#WeWantNaama, Mark Thiessen/APImages A 26-year-old American-Israeli woman who was arrested at a Moscow airport with nine and a half grams of marijuana in April was sentenced on Friday to seven and a half years of prison in Russia on drug smuggling charges. Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu has argued for Naama Issachar's release, but her case is tied up in an ongoing diplomatic dispute between Russia, Israel, and the US. Russia is attempting to secure the release of an IT specialist, Aleksey Burkov, who was wanted in the US on charges of hacking and credit card fraud and was approved for extradition to the US by Israel's Supreme Court in August after his arrest in an Israeli airp...

  • 'Powderkeg' in Germany amid Turks-Kurds conflict
    AFP

    'Powderkeg' in Germany amid Turks-Kurds conflict

    Syrian Kurd Mohamed Zidik, 76, still buys his bread and baklavas from Turkish neighbours in Berlin, but he knows better than to expound on his views about Ankara's offensive in his hometown. Since Turkish forces launched their assault on Kurds in northeastern Syria, tensions have risen in Germany where millions of Turks and Kurds live side by side. Shops have been trashed, knife attacks reported and insults traded, prompting Germany's integration commissioner Annette Widmann-Mauz to call for restraint.

  • New ICE Program Exposes Hundreds of Fraudulent ‘Family Units’ Trying to Cross The Border
    National Review

    New ICE Program Exposes Hundreds of Fraudulent ‘Family Units’ Trying to Cross The Border

    U.S. immigration authorities have discovered hundreds of instances at the border of “family unit fraud,” or unrelated individuals posing as families, over the last six months thanks to a new investigative initiative. Authorities exposed 238 fraudulent families presenting 329 false documents, according to the results of an investigation run by Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations unit in El Paso, Texas, the results of which were announced Thursday. More than 350 of those individuals are facing federal prosecution for crimes including human smuggling, making false statements, conspiracy, and illegal re-entry after removal.

  • Could France and Germany Jointly Build an EU Aircraft Carrier?
    The National Interest

    Could France and Germany Jointly Build an EU Aircraft Carrier?

    While discussing France and Germany's joint development with France of the FCAS sixth-generation stealth fighter in March 2019, the new head of Germany's governing CDU party Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer raised eyebrows with her suggestion of a chaser. As a next step, we could start the symbolic project of building an aircraft carrier to give shape to the role of the European Union as a global force for security and peace. German chancellor Angela Merkel endorsed the idea a few days later.

  • The Chicago teachers' strike shows how to go on offense against neoliberalism
    The Guardian

    The Chicago teachers' strike shows how to go on offense against neoliberalism

    Seven years ago, Rahm Emanuel had just been elected mayor and was looking to deal the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU), who he saw as a barrier to privatizing the city's education system, a crushing defeat. That agenda was shared by both Republicans and Democrats across the country, with a barrage of attacks on teachers' unions, devastating budget cuts to schools and charter school networks – intended to undercut public schools and do an end run around their unions – rapidly multiplying.

  • Trump actions look 'clearly' impeachable, says leading conservative legal figure
    Yahoo News

    Trump actions look 'clearly' impeachable, says leading conservative legal figure

    Jack Goldsmith, a former top Justice Department lawyer in the George W. Bush administration, thinks that President Trump deserves to be impeached, but the conservative legal scholar is also critical of how the Democrats are going about the process. President Trump's actions in the Ukraine scandal appear to be “clearly” impeachable and are “probably the 300th thing Trump has done that's an impeachable offense,” Goldsmith told Yahoo News in an interview on the “Long Game” podcast. “In the general scheme of things, what Schiff did doesn't even compare to what the president did,” Goldsmith said.

  • Clinton email probe finds no deliberate mishandling of classified information
    Reuters

    Clinton email probe finds no deliberate mishandling of classified information

    A U.S. State Department investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information by department employees. The investigation, the results of which were released on Friday by Republican U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley's office, centered on whether Clinton, who served as the top U.S. diplomat from 2009 to 2013, jeopardized classified information by using a private email server rather than a government one.

  • Eight Dead, Prisoners Escape in Botched Attempt to Arrest El Chapo’s Son
    The Daily Beast

    Eight Dead, Prisoners Escape in Botched Attempt to Arrest El Chapo’s Son

    Two days after Mexican authorities spectacularly failed to keep Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman's third son in custody, eight people are dead and nearly 50 dangerous prisoners who escaped from prison remain at large. On Thursday, 35 elite Mexican military troops descended on a home in the the city of Culiacán to carry out a U.S. extradition order on El Chapo's son, Ovidio Guzmán López, who was inside the property with three others. The raid led to a counter-attack by heavily armed men who surrounded the house and troops and, in what appeared to be a carefully orchestrated plan that will surely inspire a new Netflix series, unleashed chaos throughout the city with incredible precision.

  • Associated Press

    Asylum-seeking Mexicans are more prominent at US border

    A legal principle that prevents countries from sending refugees back to countries where they are likely to be persecuted has spared Mexicans from a policy that took effect in January to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico while their claims wind through U.S. immigration courts. They are also exempt from a policy, introduced last month, to deny asylum to anyone who travels through another country to reach the U.S. border without applying there first. Mexico resumed its position in August as the top-sending county of people who cross the border illegally or are stopped at official crossings, surpassing Honduras, followed by Guatemala and El Salvador.

  • Clever-Approved Travel Gear That Looks Good and Works Even Better
    Architectural Digest

    Clever-Approved Travel Gear That Looks Good and Works Even Better

    Travel in style, no matter how you're getting there Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Rep. Nunes tries to use Steele dossier to defend Trump during closed-door hearing
    Yahoo News Video

    Rep. Nunes tries to use Steele dossier to defend Trump during closed-door hearing

    During a closed-door impeachment meeting on Capitol Hill, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) brought up a topic that surprised some attendees: the Steele dossier. The context, according to three sources familiar with the episode, was his effort to explain why President Trump might be “upset” about Ukraine.

  • Ousted Communist leader Zhao Ziyang is buried: family
    AFP

    Ousted Communist leader Zhao Ziyang is buried: family

    A former Chinese Communist Party leader ousted after he opposed the use of force to quell 1989 democracy protests was buried over a decade after he died, his family said, in a service ignored by state media. Zhao Ziyang, who is a revered figure among Chinese human rights defenders, is still a sensitive topic in the country, where commemorations of his death are held under tight surveillance or prevented altogether. There was no mention of his burial ceremony Friday on state media, and searching for his name on social media returned no results.

  • Why Did 3 U.S. Navy Submarines Surface In The Pacific In 2010? China.
    The National Interest

    Why Did 3 U.S. Navy Submarines Surface In The Pacific In 2010? China.

    Nuclear powers rarely go to war with each other, but that doesn't mean they don't threaten to do so. Long-range heavy bombers are some of the best forces for crisis stability, Morgan wrote in a 2013 study for the U.S. Air Force. On the other hand, the U.S. Navy's submarine-launched cruise missiles are less effective — even counterproductive — for crisis stability … because they're invisible most of the time.

  • Next-Gen Dodge Challenger Coming in 2023? Don't Be So Sure, Says Dodge
    Car and Driver

    Next-Gen Dodge Challenger Coming in 2023? Don't Be So Sure, Says Dodge

    Muscle Cars and Trucks noticed a 2023-mile odometer reading in press photos of the 2020 Dodge Challenger, which they and others thought could signal that the next generation's release is in 2023. Dodge is a frequent user of teasers to reveal upcoming cars, but a Dodge spokesperson told C/D this is not that. The automaker also reportedly has a track-focused ACR variant of the Challenger in the works.

  • Here's the Deadline Countdown for Every Trump Impeachment Subpoena Issued So Far
    Time

    Here's the Deadline Countdown for Every Trump Impeachment Subpoena Issued So Far

    If Congress drops a subpoena and no one responds, does it have an impact? At present, six of the eight major subpoenas that House Democrats have issued to Trump administration officials and departments have gone unanswered past the deadline set in the request, with the clock rapidly ticking down on the final two, which are due Friday, Oct. 18. Subpoenas can both compel an individual to testify and/or turn over documents, as is the case with U.S. Ambassador to the E.U. Gordon Sonderland, who testified in a closed-door hearing Thursday but has not provided any requested material.

  • Mitch McConnell Calls Syria Withdrawal ‘Grave Strategic Mistake’
    National Review

    Mitch McConnell Calls Syria Withdrawal ‘Grave Strategic Mistake’

    Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky. lambasted the Trump administration's decision to withdraw Troops from Syria on Friday, declaring that “America's wars will be 'endless' only if America refuses to win them. In an op-ed published in the Washington Post, McConnell — who said on Thursday that he wanted “a strong, forward-looking strategic statement” — called Trump's withdrawal “a grave strategic mistake” that mirrors “the Obama administration's reckless withdrawal from Iraq, which facilitated the rise of the Islamic State in the first place.

  • Erdogan says Turkey to resume Syria offensive if truce deal falters
    Reuters

    Erdogan says Turkey to resume Syria offensive if truce deal falters

    President Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday Turkey would press on with its offensive into northeastern Syria and "crush the heads of terrorists" if a deal with Washington on the withdrawal of Kurdish fighters from the area was not fully implemented. Erdogan agreed on Thursday in talks with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence a five-day pause in the offensive to allow time for the Kurdish fighters to withdraw from a "safe zone" Turkey aims to establish in northeast Syria near the Turkish border. In the last 36 hours, there have been 14 "provocative attacks" from Syria, Turkey's defense ministry said, adding it was continuing to coordinate closely with Washington on implementation of the accord.

  • Hondurans call for president to step down after drug verdict
    Associated Press

    Hondurans call for president to step down after drug verdict

    Opposition groups called Saturday for continuing protests to demand that Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández be removed from office after his younger brother was convicted of drug trafficking in a New York court. Thousands of Hondurans protested into the early hours of the morning after Juan Antonio "Tony" Hernández was convicted Friday in what U.S. prosecutors described as a conspiracy that relied on "state-sponsored drug trafficking." Protesters blocked key roads in half of the country's 18 provinces, setting barricades ablaze, while some took advantage of the disturbances to loot stores.

  • Moms Demand Action founder says advocacy group is not anti-gun
    CBS News

    Moms Demand Action founder says advocacy group is not anti-gun

    Moms Demand Action is a grassroots organization advocating for stronger gun control measures, founded as a Facebook group the day after the that took the lives of 26 people, 20 of whom were young children. But while its members advocate for an assault ban, Moms Demand Action founder Shannon Watts says that it's a "misnomer" to call the group anti-gun. "Often people think that because we're doing this work, we're anti-gun or we don't support the Second Amendment.

  • Business Insider

    Archaeologists have located an ancient city hidden in the Cambodian jungle. The discovery was 150 years in the making.

    Archaeology Development Foundation Archaeologists have been trying to uncover the ancient city of Mahendraparvata for 150 years. The city was one of the first capitals of the Khmer Empire, but it emptied after a new capital was built in Angkor. For centuries, the site has been covered by dense trees that make it hard to observe.

  • High-profile cases turn spotlight on domestic violence in Russia
    AFP

    High-profile cases turn spotlight on domestic violence in Russia

    Natalia Tunikova's partner pushed her towards the open balcony in their high-rise Moscow flat, before punching her to the floor. Cases like Tunikova's are ever more widely reported in Russia, leading to a public outcry in a country that has no specific law on domestic violence and where feminist movements like #MeToo had little impact. This summer, a case against three teenage sisters who killed their father after what lawyers say was years of beatings and sexual abuse made national and global headlines.