Police say they banged on Breonna Taylor's door 30 to 90 seconds - recordings

(Former Louisville Police Detective Brett Hankison in audio recording: "and this went on probably 30, 45 seconds of banging and announcing, knocking and announcing.")

In released audio recordings, police serving a search warrant on Breonna Taylor's home told investigators they banged on her door and announced themselves from 30 to 90 seconds before breaking in, during a botched raid that ended with the officers fatally shooting her.

The newly revealed details from the police officers contrast with earlier witness reports, and their account has been a point of contention in the case that has captured national attention and prompted street protests over racism and police use of force.

Kentucky's attorney general on Friday released the audio recordings of the grand jury proceedings that cleared the two white officers who shot Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency medical technician, and charged a third with wanton endangerment for stray bullets that hit a neighboring apartment in the March 13th raid.

And in a police interview on March 25th, Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly, the officer who was wounded, said police banged on Taylor's door six or seven different times, repeatedly announcing they were police there to serve a search warrant.

"Bang on the door, no response. Banged on it again, no response. At that point, we start announcing ourselves, 'Police - please come to the door. Police - we have a search warrant'

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, however had a different account.

"I was scared to death. So she says, 'There's another knock at the door'. She's yelling at the top of her lungs, and I am too at this point, 'Who is it?' No answer, no response... so when we get out of the bed or whatever, like walking towards the door, the door like comes off the hinges. So I just let off one shot. I still can't see who it is or anything. So now the door is like flying open, I hear one shot and all of a sudden there's a whole lot of shots."

Walker said he believed the plainclothes officers who burst in might have been Taylor's ex-boyfriend. He fired once with a 9 mm handgun that he was licensed to carry, wounding one officer.

Police then fired 32 rounds, six of which hit Taylor who was unarmed.

The recordings made over three days of proceedings also show police were confused by the burst of their own gunfire.

Strikingly absent were any recordings of prosecutors' recommendations that might have revealed how prosecutors guided the thinking of the grand jurors.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said in a statement that recommendations were not recorded because they are quote "not evidence".

Street protesters have called for the arrest of the officers and demanded justice for Taylor, whose family won a $12 million dollar wrongful death settlement from the city of Louisville.

Video Transcript

BRENT HANKISON: --and this went on for probably 30, 45 seconds of banging and announcing.

- In released audio recordings, police serving a search warrant on Breonna Taylor's home told investigators they banged on her door and announced themselves from 30 to 90 seconds before breaking in during a botched raid that ended with the officers fatally shooting her. The newly revealed details from the police officers contrast with earlier witness reports, and their account has been a point of contention in the case that has captured national attention and prompted street protests over racism and police use of force.

Kentucky's attorney general, on Friday, released the audio recordings of the grand jury proceedings that cleared the two white officers who shot Taylor, a 26-year-old black emergency medical technician, and charged a third with wanton endangerment for stray bullets that hit a neighboring apartment in the March 13 raid.

And in a police interview on March 25, Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly, the officer who was wounded, said police banged on Taylor's door six or seven different times, repeatedly announcing they were police there to serve a search warrant.

JONATHAN MATTINGLY: Banged on the door. No response. Banged on it again. No response. At that point we started announcing ourselves. Police, please come to the door. Police, we have a search warrant.

- Kenneth Walker, Taylor's boyfriend, however, had a different account.

KENNETH WALKER: I was scared to death. She says that there's another knock at the door. She's yelling at the top of her lungs and I am, too at this point. Who is it? No answer. No response. So we get out of bed, whatever, like walking towards the door. The-- Like the door like comes like off the hinges. So I just let off one shot. Like I still can't see who it is or anything. So now the door is flying open-- off one shot, then all of a sudden there's a whole lot of shots.

- Walker said he believed the plain clothes officers who burst in might have been Taylor's ex-boyfriend. He fired once with a 9 millimeter handgun that he was licensed to carry, wounding one officer. Police then fired 32 rounds, six of which hit Taylor, who was unarmed.

The recordings, made over three days of proceedings, also show police were confused by the burst of their own gunfire. Strikingly absent were any recordings of prosecutors' recommendations that might have revealed how prosecutors guided the thinking of the grand jurors. Kentucky Attorney General, Daniel Cameron said in a statement that recommendations were not recorded because they are, quote, "not evidence."

Street protesters have called for the arrest of the officers and demanded justice for Taylor, whose family won a 12 million dollar wrongful death settlement from the city of Louisville.