Police solved an Alaskan murder with a memory card found along road

An Alaskan murder mystery has been solved thanks to a SD card found laying in the street. The memory card found along road shows an Anchorage man assaulting and killing woman.

  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.
    INSIDER

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    earlier in July. South Africa's government had also banned the sale of alcohol but has since eased that restriction, which according to an AP report, has led to an increase in "drunken brawls and traffic accidents, putting added strain on hospitals as they deal with the virus." Reuters FITA is also arguing that by banning the legal sale of cigarettes, the South African government is encouraging a black market trade, and putting thousands of jobs at risk.

  • Appeals court: 1st federal execution in 17 years can proceed
    Associated Press

    Appeals court: 1st federal execution in 17 years can proceed

    A federal appeals court ruled Sunday that the first federal execution in nearly two decades may proceed as scheduled on Monday. The ruling from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturns a lower court order that had put the execution of 47-year-old Daniel Lewis Lee on hold. Lee, of Yukon, Oklahoma, had been scheduled to die by lethal injection on Monday at a federal prison in Indiana.

  • Sen. Mitt Romney Calls Trump's Decision to Commute Roger Stone's Sentence 'Historic Corruption'
    Time

    Sen. Mitt Romney Calls Trump's Decision to Commute Roger Stone's Sentence 'Historic Corruption'

    On Saturday morning, Utah Sen. Mitt Romney became the first Congressional Republican so far to speak out against President Donald Trump's Friday night decision to commute the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone. Stone had been sentenced to 40 months in prison for multiple felonies including lying to Congress and attempting to obstruct the Congressional investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. “Unprecedented, historic corruption: an American president commutes the sentence of a person convicted by a jury of lying to shield that very president,” Romney tweeted Saturday morning. The President's announcement that he would commute Stone's sentence came just a few days before the Republican political operative was set to enter prison.

  • ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant
    Miami Herald

    ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant

    A Silicon Valley tech CEO has resigned over a viral video of his ejection from a California restaurant for his racist tirade directed at an Asian family celebrating a birthday. “I have once again begun my journey back to sobriety and have enrolled in an anti-racist program with immediate effect,” said former Solid8 CEO Michael Lofthouse in a statement Saturday, reported The San Francisco Chronicle. “My comments towards the families involved were racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate,” Lofthouse said, according to the publication.

  • India's Biocon secures approval to use drug on coronavirus patients
    Reuters

    India's Biocon secures approval to use drug on coronavirus patients

    India's Biocon Ltd has received regulatory approval for its drug Itolizumab to be used on coronavirus infected patients suffering from moderate to severe respiratory distress, the biopharmaceutical company said in a statement on Saturday. The drug, which is also used to cure the skin disease psoriasis, was cleared by the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) for usage in India. "The randomised control trial indicated that all the patients treated with Itolizumab responded positively and recovered," said Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, the firm's executive chairperson.

  • University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge
    NBC News

    University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

    However, professors were initially required to return to campus to teach in person and there wasn't an option to work remotely. The university later put in place a policy where faculty could file a request to work remotely, but there wasn't a guarantee that the request would be accommodated. Boston University philosophy professors Daniel Star and Russell Powell wrote an open letter to the university urging it to allow professors to make their own decisions about returning to campus.

  • A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October
    Business Insider

    A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October

    Boom Supersonic Aircraft start-up Boom Supersonic is one step closer to bringing back supersonic passenger travel with its flagship Overture jet. The Overture's prototype and demonstrator, the XB-1, will be unveiled in October and plans to take to the skies in 2021. If the XB-1 has a successful test flight program, the Overture could fly within the next 10 years, bringing back supersonic travel to the public.

  • Spectacular photos capture Neowise, one of the brightest comets in decades
    CBS News

    Spectacular photos capture Neowise, one of the brightest comets in decades

    Neowise, one of the brightest comets in decades, has brought with it a stunning debris trail this month, delighting skywatchers around the world. Even astronauts aboard the International Space Station have captured the stunning celestial phenomenon, which promises to bring even more spectacular sightings as the month goes on. During the month of July, the newly-discovered comet Neowise, formally named Comet C2020 F3 NEOWISE by NASA, has been visible in the early hours before sunrise.

  • Bosnia Muslims mourn their dead 25 years after Srebrenica massacre
    AFP

    Bosnia Muslims mourn their dead 25 years after Srebrenica massacre

    Bosnian Muslims marked the 25th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre on Saturday, the worst atrocity on European soil since World War II, with the memorial ceremony sharply reduced as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Many mourners braved the tighter restrictions put in place to stem the spread of COVID-19 to attend the commemorations which culminated in a ceremony laying to rest the remains of nine victims identified over the past year. On July 11, 1995, after capturing Srebrenica, Serb forces killed more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys in a few days.

  • Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory
    The Telegraph

    Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory

    Russia's intelligence services have 'stepped up' their war on free media, carrying out a series of operations designed to intimidate journalists in the wake of Vladimir Putin's controversial referendum victory last week. In an unprecedented case for post-Soviet Russia, prominent defence reporter Ivan Safronov was seized outside his home on Tuesday morning by secret service agents and arrested on suspicion of treason. Last week's overwhelming approval of constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay in office at least until 2036 was hailed by the Kremlin as a “triumph.”

  • City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew
    Associated Press

    City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew

    The fate of one of Alaska's most historic yet neglected structures could be decided Monday as city officials in Seward weigh whether to demolish a former Methodist boarding school where the Alaska territorial flag was first flown almost a century ago and where its Alaska Native designer lived. Benny Benson was among the orphans and displaced children who lived at the Jesse Lee Home, many of whom were sent there after the Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages. Benson, a 13-year-old Aleut boy sent to the home after his mother died of the flu, won a territory-wide contest in 1927 to design the flag, which became the state flag after statehood was granted in 1959.

  • Pelosi: Trump ‘crossed a bridge’ when he donned mask
    Politico

    Pelosi: Trump ‘crossed a bridge’ when he donned mask

    President Donald Trump "crossed a bridge" when he donned a mask in public for the first time over the weekend, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday. Pelosi called the move an "admission" that masks help stop the spread of Covid-19 during an interview on CNN's "State of the Union." Trump's trip to Walter Reed National Medical Center on Saturday marked the first time the Republican president wore a mask in public.

  • Hong Kong security law: Why we are taking our BNOs and leaving
    BBC

    Hong Kong security law: Why we are taking our BNOs and leaving

    Since China imposed a draconian national security law on Hong Kong, a lot of dinner party chatter in this protest-minded city has been about personal exit strategies. Michael and Serena have decided to leave Hong Kong for good and settle in the UK, a country they have never set foot in. The couple have British National (Overseas) - or BNO - passports, which were issued to Hong Kong residents that registered before the city was handed back to China on July 1997.

  • WHO reports record daily increase in global coronavirus cases, up over 230,000
    Reuters

    WHO reports record daily increase in global coronavirus cases, up over 230,000

    The biggest increases were from the United States, Brazil, India and South Africa, according to a daily report. The previous WHO record for new cases was 228,102 on July 10. Global coronavirus cases were approaching 13 million on Sunday, according to a Reuters tally, marking another milestone in the spread of the disease that has killed more than 565,000 people in seven months.

  • Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says
    Baltimore Sun

    Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says

    After Baltimore police officers shot a man who pulled a firearm while undergoing a behavioral health crisis last week, the organization that oversees the city's behavioral health services called the current system “a total failure” that needs better integration of mental health professionals with the police. There is no indication that police dispatchers attempted to connect available behavioral health resources with officers on the scene before they shot Ricky Walker Jr. on July 1, said Adrienne Breidenstine, vice president of policy and communications for Behavioral Health System Baltimore. The city has two so-called crisis response teams that handle mental health issues, one inside the police department and another at the nonprofit Baltimore Crisis Response Inc. Breidenstine said the incident highlights how the city has created an unnecessarily complex system to deal with people in crisis.

  • Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously
    Business Insider

    Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously

    Japanese authorities say they are "shocked" after a significant coronavirus outbreak at two US Marine bases in the country. 61 Marines have been infected with the virus in recent days, spread across two bases in Okinawa prefecture, home to about 26,000 US service personnel. "We now have strong doubts that the US military has taken adequate disease prevention measures," Okinawa governor Denny Tamaki said at a press conference.

  • Phoenix mayor says city still has "a real challenge with testing"
    CBS News

    Phoenix mayor says city still has "a real challenge with testing"

    Washington – Amid a spike of coronavirus infections across the Sun Belt and the West, Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said her city still faces a "real challenge" with coronavirus testing, echoing the concerns governors on the East Coast raised as their own states battled rising infections earlier in the pandemic. "It continues to be a very difficult situation in the greater Phoenix area," Gallego said Sunday on "Face the Nation." "We are seeing positivity rates above 20%.

  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives
    Yahoo News Video

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.

  • Pennsylvania police investigating after 'disturbing' video shows officer kneeling on man's neck in Allentown
    USA TODAY

    Pennsylvania police investigating after 'disturbing' video shows officer kneeling on man's neck in Allentown

    Police in Pennsylvania are investigating after an officer appeared to put a knee on the neck of a person during an incident captured on video by at least one bystander that drew comparisons to the death of George Floyd. The Allentown Police Department is conducting a use of force investigation, according to a statement released Sunday. The video drew immediate condemnation from attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Floyd's family.

  • Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown
    Associated Press

    Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown

    A misaligned missile battery, miscommunication between troops and their commanders and a decision to fire without authorization all led to Iran's Revolutionary Guard shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner in January, killing all 176 people on board, a new report says. The report released late Saturday by Iran's Civil Aviation Organization comes months after the Jan. 8 crash near Tehran. Authorities had initially denied responsibility, only changing course days later after Western nations presented extensive evidence that Iran had shot down the plane.

  • Sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopen
    Reuters Videos

    Sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopen

    Hamburg's red light district has been dark since March, but for one evening only - the lights went back on. Prostitutes took to windows in protest late on Saturday evening (July 11), demanding that Germany's licensed brothels reopen after months of shutdown. Sex workers say they are being singled out and deprived of their livelihood, as shops, restaurants and bars all open their doors again.

  • As coronavirus cases climb, Trump says states with an uptick in cases are 'going to be fine' and will be back to normal 'very quickly'
    INSIDER

    As coronavirus cases climb, Trump says states with an uptick in cases are 'going to be fine' and will be back to normal 'very quickly'

    Coronavirus death rates are on the rise amid a recent uptick of cases in states including California, Arizona, Florida, and Texas. In response to the resurgence in cases, President Donald Trump told Noticias Telemundo these states "are going to be fine" and will "have it under control very quickly." Coronavirus deaths are once again on the rise amid a surge of confirmed cases in states like Arizona, California, Texas, and Florida — and President Donald Trump claims these regions are "going to be fine."

  • U.S. weighs limited options to deal with China over Hong Kong: WSJ
    Reuters

    U.S. weighs limited options to deal with China over Hong Kong: WSJ

    Steps against Hong Kong's financial system risk hurting U.S., Western and Hong Kong companies and consumers, according to the report https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-weighs-limited-options-to-punish-china-over-hong-kong-11594576800?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=10, citing U.S. officials and analysts. Measures like more targeted sanctions against Chinese officials and trade moves against products made in Hong Kong would have little impact on Beijing's integration of the city into the mainland's political and security system, the Journal added. On Thursday, Trump administration officials discussed Hong Kong plans in a White House meeting, people familiar with the gathering told the Journal.

  • Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days
    BBC

    Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days

    An outspoken critic of China's rulers, Professor Xu Zhangrun, has been released after six days in police custody, friends say. The Beijing constitutional law professor was already under house arrest when he was detained on 6 July. He had criticised China's response to coronavirus and what he sees as a Mao-like cult of personality under China's current leader, Xi Jinping.

  • Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions
    Business Insider

    Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions

    Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images Secondary passports are in high demand as the coronavirus pandemic causes travel restrictions around the world. In the Caribbean, some nations are offering steep discounts to bring in extra revenue amid a cash crunch. Passport buying has shifted from simple vacations to riding out the virus, experts say.