Popular Charlotte-area sports bar could lose its license after a DWI crash, ALE says

Joe Marusak
·2 min read

CORRECTION: EARLIER VERSIONS OF THIS ARTICLE MISIDENTIFIED BEANTOWN TAVERN OWNER DONNIE GASKIN.

Earlier versions of this article A popular Charlotte-area sports bar could have its liquor permits suspended or revoked after one of its bartenders was charged with serving alcoholic beverages to an intoxicated woman, N.C. Law Enforcement Division officials said.

After leaving Beantown Tavern in Matthews on Feb. 22, the patron was seriously hurt in a crash and was later charged with driving while intoxicated, according to a division news release.

Her blood alcohol content was .22, nearly three times the legal limit for driving, according to the release, which didn’t name the driver or give her age.

The driver wrecked on Crowell Dairy Road in the Union County town of Indian Trail, officials said. That’s about 12 miles from the tavern on Matthews Station Street in Matthews.

The bartender, 32-year-old Chelsea Marie Mullis, is scheduled to appear in Mecklenburg County District Court in May.

ALE special agents determined various violations against Beantown Tavern, including employees performing services after consuming alcohol; intoxication by permittee; and allowing intoxicated patrons to consume alcohol on the premises.

On Tuesday, agents submitted a violations report to the N.C. ABC Commission, which could fine the tavern and suspend or revoke its ABC permits.

“Every retailer who sells alcohol has the ability and responsibility to refuse the sale to an impaired person,” Omar Qureshi, ALE special agent in charge of the Harrisburg district, said in the release. “State law protects employees for the refusal, and it could save a life.”

The ALE Harrisburg office includes Mecklenburg, Union and seven other counties.

Beantown Tavern owner Donnie Gaskin couldn’t be reached for comment on Friday.

The tavern, which carries the nickname of the city of Boston, is a popular hangout for New England sports fans. The nickname refers to “a popular regional dish of Boston baked beans, baked in molasses for hours,” according to Oyster.com.