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Prince Philip: Memories shared

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Those who encountered the Duke of Edinburgh over the years share their stories and memories.

Video Transcript

KATERINA VITTOZZI: When it came to the Duke, even a brief meeting could provide a lifelong anecdote. We asked people to send us their memories. Our inbox was inundated with stories like Sunil Dharmabandhu's memories of Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, in 1954, when the Queen and Prince Philip visited.

SUNIL DHARMABANDHU: The reception for the Queen and Prince Philip was well underway. I was eight. I managed to lose my way and lost my parents. Then came a policeman and took me by my hand and took me to the tent where the public address system was installed, so everything was topped to make an announcement, asking my parents to come and pick me up. So when my father came up, very close to where the Queen and Prince Philip were seated, to take me back to where they were, I was not interested in seeing the Queen. I was so pleased to have been able to see my parents back.

KATERINA VITTOZZI: After a year where there's been so much loss and so much grief it might seem startling that the death of a 99-year-old man could cause so many people to stop, pause, and reflect but perhaps it speaks to the Duke's longevity, to the breadth of his interests and his character, that an encounter with him seems difficult to forget. Imam Qari Asim met him at Buckingham Palace in 2005 with a group of other faith leaders.

IMAM QARI ASIM: It was an extraordinary meeting in that he used his wit and wisdom to communicate. He was very considerate, but also very knowledgeable about other religions.

KATERINA VITTOZZI: Some didn't even have to meet the Duke to be struck by him. Harry Emmett from Accrington is a hobby photographer. In 1977, Harry and friends wrote to Buckingham Palace. They asked if they could use some wildlife photographs taken by the Duke in their camera club's annual exhibition at this local art gallery.

HARRY EMMETT: I received a phone call from Norman Potter, who was at the time curator at the [INAUDIBLE] gallery, who said, I've just had a phone call about you from Buckingham Palace. You know, the Duke, London, Buckingham Palace? Accrington? The fact that we had been recognized and been trusted to take these photographs was quite a surprise.

ALEXANDER TRIGG: Yeah, my father was working out in the Middle East, the Iraq Patrolling Company, around the early 1960s, and him and his best friend were doing up the boat, a Flying Fifteen boat, which really required a total overhaul. So they needed some sails, so they wrote to the UK Flying Fifteen Association, seeing if anyone had any sails they could send out. And then about three or four weeks later they got this parcel in the post with a handwritten letter that's none other than the Duke of Edinburgh saying, here's some sails, enjoy it, I hope you have good fun with it, which I thought was a lovely touch of someone who's so busy.

JAYNE GRIFFITHS: My father was commanding officer on the Trinity House Patricia at the time, 1981, and see this, obviously hosting the Duke on board. It must have been nearly 20 years later that Father got invited to the garden party at Buckingham Palace and he was able to take two children, so I went along. Whilst the Duke came down his line, he actually broke away from his equerry, made a beeline for my dad, and he came over and had quite an informal chat with us all, which was really, really lovely.

KATERINA VITTOZZI: The Duke was described to us today as a legend, his legacy certainly hard to forget. Katerina Vittozzi, Sky News.