How Prince Philip's funeral will be marked across the world and in the Commonwealth

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Britain's Prince Philip (L) receives flowers as he meets with wellwishers gathered in Perth for a 'Great Aussie Barbecue' event 
Britain's Prince Philip (L) receives flowers as he meets with wellwishers gathered in Perth for a 'Great Aussie Barbecue' event

Tributes from across the globe are expected to pour in on Saturday as the Duke of Edinburgh is laid to rest at St. George’s Chapel.

Buckingham Palace has confirmed that the funeral on April 17 will have just 30 mourners due to current coronavirus guidelines - but they will be joined in thought by millions.

Broadcasters from around the world have set up positions outside Windsor Castle, alongside a steady stream of well-wishers leaving floral tributes.

Commonwealth countries are expected to lead with days of national mourning and their own ceremonies, while British troops abroad will conduct the centuries long tradition of gun salutes.

Read below to find out how nations will pay their respects to the Queen’s strength and stay:

Australia

Australia’s national flag will be flown at half mast on Saturday, as it had been following the Duke’s death. All major news channels will broadcast the funeral.

A digital book for leaving condolence messages will be online, as well as a gallery celebrating the Duke’s life.

Australians can watch live streams on the Courier Mail, Daily Telegraph, Herald Sun and Adelaide Advertiser. Network ABC will also give live coverage from midnight (AEST) on Saturday.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wave to the crowd whilst on their Commonwealth visit to Australia, 1954 - Fox Photos /2013 Getty Images 
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip wave to the crowd whilst on their Commonwealth visit to Australia, 1954 - Fox Photos /2013 Getty Images

Canada

Canada will mark the Duke’s funeral with a national day of mourning, their own service and a gun salute. All Canadian flags will fly at half mast until sunset, both at home and abroad.

The commemoration will come just hours after the Duke is laid to rest at St.George’s Chapel, but will take place without a congregation.

In light of the pandemic, virtual tributes and performances will instead mark the Duke’s long standing connection to the country at the Christ Church Cathedral in Ottawa.

Live coverage from CBC will begin on television at 9am (EST), with radio following at 10am on Saturday.

Queen Elizabeth II with Prince Philip and Princess Anne in Tuktoyaktuk, in the Northwest Territories of Canada, July 1970 - David Cairns /Hulton Archive 
Queen Elizabeth II with Prince Philip and Princess Anne in Tuktoyaktuk, in the Northwest Territories of Canada, July 1970 - David Cairns /Hulton Archive

Cyprus

Parish churches across Cyprus have been encouraged to hold a commemorative service before the funeral.

Cyprus became familiar to the Duke when he was an officer in the Mediterranean fleet, in which he spent a decade in local waters.

Denmark

The Danish court announced that flags over Queen Margrethe II’s official residence at Amalienborg, Copenhagen, will fly at half-mast, as per her request, for the Duke's funeral.

Queen Margrethe of Denmark is related to the Duke - both having cousins descended from Victoria and King Christian IX.

Margrethe also shares a close relationship with the Queen.

Queen Margrethe and the Duke - Ian Jones Retained 
Queen Margrethe and the Duke - Ian Jones Retained

New Zealand

A state memorial will be held in honour of Prince Philip in New Zealand next week, according to prime minister Jacinda Ardern.

The ceremony is set to be held on April 21, missing the day of the Duke’s funeral, but will coincide with the Queen’s 95th birthday.

Ms Ardern will be joined by Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy​ at 3pm in Wellington. More updates are expected to follow soon.

The funeral will be broadcast on both TVNZ 1 and Three, who will screen it live from 11.30pm (GMT+12).

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip pose with U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy at Buckingham Palace in London - REUTERS
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip pose with U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy at Buckingham Palace in London - REUTERS

Norway

King of Norway Harald V announced that flags would be flown at half mast from the Royal Palace in Oslo on the day of the funeral.

During his life the Duke visited Norway a number of times, including personal trips to see friends and family.

Sweden

Sweden will honour the Duke on Saturday ahead of his funeral in the UK.

The Duke was made a Knight of the Order of the Seraphim by King Gustaf VI Adolf on 23 June 1954.

It is traditional in Sweden to hold a Seraphim Toll for a deceased Knight of the Order of the Seraphim on the same day as the funeral.

The Duke's Seraphim Toll will take place from 12.00 to 13.00 (CEST) in Riddarholm Church in Stockholm.

United States

After learning of Prince Philip’s death, President Joe Biden praised his “decades of devoted public service”.

Mr Biden added that the Duke's legacy would live on through his family as well as the “charitable endeavours” he helped shape.

Americans will be able to watch the proceedings live on CNN International from 8am (EST).

Chief International Anchor for CNN Christiane Amanpour will lead the coverage from Buckingham Palace.

Chief Jack Naiva (with beard) and some of his tribe members, who worship the Duke of Edinburgh as a God - Richard Shears/Rex Features
Chief Jack Naiva (with beard) and some of his tribe members, who worship the Duke of Edinburgh as a God - Richard Shears/Rex Features

Vanuatu

Prince Philip is regarded as a god-like figure by a tribe in the island nation of Vanuatu - so it will come as no surprise that their tribute is one of the most extensive.

The remote group will mark the duke’s funeral with ceremonial drinking of the native plant Kava, dancing and speeches.

The Duke’s following began during an official visit to Vanuatu in 1971, where he took part in some traditional rituals on the northern island of Malekula.

It then evolved over the decades as the two parties occasionally exchanged gifts, photographs and letters with one another.

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