Prince William and Kate Middleton host bingo for nursing home residents

Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, recently hosted bingo for the residents of a nursing home on Wales. The game was for a good cause in honor of health care workers across the United Kingdom.

  • Obama to George Floyd protesters: Channel 'justifiable anger' into action
    Yahoo News

    Obama to George Floyd protesters: Channel 'justifiable anger' into action

    Former President Barack Obama on Monday addressed the nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, praising the “overwhelming majority” of peaceful demonstrators, condemning the violence brought on by a “small minority” and calling on a “new generation of activists” to “bring about real change.” “The waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States,” Obama wrote in an essay published on Medium.com. The former president then lauded police in Camden, N.J., and Flint, Mich., for publicly supporting peaceful protests before he criticized demonstrators who have been acting violently.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting

    The survey, conducted on May 29 and 30, found that 52 percent of Americans answered yes when asked whether they “think that President Trump is a racist.” Only 37 percent said no. Just 33 percent said the president should continue “posting messages on Twitter.”

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez accuses New York police union of threatening Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter after her arrest at Saturday's protests
    Business Insider

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez accuses New York police union of threatening Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter after her arrest at Saturday's protests

    REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York progressive, slammed a New York City Police Department union for tweeting confidential information about Mayor Bill de Blasio's daughter's arrest on Saturday during a protest against racism. The Sergeants Benevolent Association tweeted a screenshot of Chiara de Blasio's arrest record and attacked the mayor over his daughter's participation in the protests. Ocasio-Cortez urged the NYPD to de-escalate with protesters rather than respond with violent force, and she told the union to "apologize and own this egregious behavior."

  • Retired officer, ex-college athlete among victims of unrest
    Associated Press

    Retired officer, ex-college athlete among victims of unrest

    One man was a retired St. Louis police captain checking on his friend's shop. Another was the beloved owner of a Louisville barbecue restaurant who provided free meals to officers. The deaths, as well as widespread peaceful protests, have at times been overshadowed by the shocking images of heavy-handed police tactics, vandalism and arson.

  • Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore apologizes after saying George Floyd's death is on the 'hands' of looters
    USA TODAY

    Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore apologizes after saying George Floyd's death is on the 'hands' of looters

    Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Tuesday faced calls to fire Police Chief Michel Moore after Moore said the death of George Floyd was on the "hands" of those inciting criminal acts at protests as much as the officers involved in Minneapolis. While providing an update on Monday, alongside Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas, Moore reported the LAPD had made 700 arrests on Sunday night — 70 of those arrests, he said, were people "who were either burglarizing or looting, victimizing, businesses further." "We didn't have protests last night.

  • Iranian 'spy' scientist flies home after release from US prison, raising hopes of prisoner swap
    The Telegraph

    Iranian 'spy' scientist flies home after release from US prison, raising hopes of prisoner swap

    The families of British dual nationals imprisoned by Iran today criticised the Foreign Office for “complete inaction” in trying to secure their release, as an Iranian scientist previously jailed by the US was allowed to fly home. A plane carrying Sirous Asgari took off early this morning and was on its way back to Tehran to bring him home, Iran's foreign minister announced, raising hopes of a potential prisoner swap for Western dual nationals in Iran. Mr Asgari was accused by a US court in 2016 of stealing trade secrets while on an academic visit to Ohio, where he visited a university working on projects for the US Navy.

  • U.S. firms concerned as tensions simmer in Hong Kong over looming legislation
    Reuters

    U.S. firms concerned as tensions simmer in Hong Kong over looming legislation

    A survey of U.S. businesses on Wednesday revealed deep fears for the future of their operations in Hong Kong if China imposes national security legislation that critics say could curb the financial centre's freedoms and fuel ongoing protests. Contributing to simmering anti-government tensions, Hong Kong lawmakers are set to resume a debate over a controversial bill that would criminalise disrespect of China's national anthem, following scuffles in the legislature in recent weeks. Following that, demonstrations are planned to mark the anniversary of the million-people march on June 9 last year against a since-withdrawn mainland China extradition bill, and the protests three days later that were met by police with tear gas and rubber bullets in scenes which radicalised moderates.

  • The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email
    INSIDER

    The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email

    Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images In a leaked email, the president of the Minneapolis Federation of Police said the ongoing protests over the death of George Floyd were a "terrorist movement" that has occurred following a "long time build up which dates back years." Lt. Bob Kroll blamed politicians for the ongoing tension, specifically targeting Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey. The former police chief of Minneapolis called on Kroll to resign, and Frey said Kroll was "shockingly indifferent to his role in undermining that trust and support" of the police force.

  • Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'
    NBC News

    Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'

    Rep. Eliot Engel, a New York Democrat facing a tough primary challenge and questions about his absence from his district, was caught on a hot mic at a district event responding to unrest saying twice that he only wanted press coverage because of an electoral threat. “If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care,” Engel said to Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, at a Tuesday press conference responding to unrest and vandalism in his district related to the recent death of George Floyd. Diaz worried about having too many elected officials speak, but Engel pleaded with him for coverage.

  • D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'
    Yahoo News Video

    D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'

    Hours into the mandatory curfew in Washington, D.C., several police officers were recorded engaging in peaceful dialogue with protesters. While remaining in opposition to the extended protests over George Floyd's death, one officer appeared to commiserate with protesters' desire to seek change.

  • Appeals court mulls making Hillary Clinton testify on emails
    Politico

    Appeals court mulls making Hillary Clinton testify on emails

    As a federal appeals court grappled on Tuesday with a politically charged dispute that long ago faded from the headlines, one of the most urgent and politically polarizing legal fights of the moment seemed to lurk just below the surface. The official topic of Tuesday's arguments before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals was Hillary Clinton's bid to avoid giving an in-person deposition to a conservative group about the subject that dogged her during her 2016 presidential bid: her use of a private email account and server during her tenure as secretary of state. Both the Clinton deposition dispute and the Flynn case imbroglio involve an obscure type of legal mechanism that is not currently a household word but may soon be, at least in Washington: mandamus.

  • ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC
    The Independent

    ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC

    US riot police were broadcast live on air using aggressive force to push and knock down an Australian reporter and her cameraman as they covered the Black Lives Matter protests in Washington DC, prompting an investigation by the Australian embassy. Amelia Brace, a reporter for Australian television network Channel 7, was broadcasting from the White House with cameraman Timothy Myers when police plouged into the crowd with riot shields, firing rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them. Footage of the police barrelling at the camera and shoving the news team was viewed over a million times in a matter of hours.

  • Confederate monuments coming down around South amid protests
    Associated Press

    Confederate monuments coming down around South amid protests

    Sarah Collins Rudolph thought she'd never see what happened in her hometown: Prompted by protests, the city removed a 115-year-old Confederate monument near where her sister and three other black girls died in a racist church bombing in 1963. A wave of Confederate memorial removals that began after a white supremacist killed nine black people at a Bible study in a church in South Carolina in 2015 is again rolling, with more relics of the Old South being removed from public view after the killing of George Floyd by police in Minnesota. In Birmingham, where Rudolph lives, the graffiti-covered, pocked base of a massive Confederate monument was all that remained Tuesday after crews dismantled the towering obelisk and trucked it away in pieces overnight.

  • Cuomo Hypothesizes About Overthrowing de Blasio After NYC Riots: ‘Police Did Not Do Their Job Last Night’
    The Daily Beast

    Cuomo Hypothesizes About Overthrowing de Blasio After NYC Riots: ‘Police Did Not Do Their Job Last Night’

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo openly hypothesized on Tuesday about overthrowing NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio after rampant looting and destruction swept across Manhattan on Monday night, overwhelming the NYPD and leaving the city looking like a war zone. De Blasio had doubled NYPD officers out on the streets to 8,000 on Monday night and imposed an 11 p.m. curfew after three nights of protests against police brutality were overshadowed by violence.

  • Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak
    Business Insider

    Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak

    Xinhua via REUTERS China delayed the release of information about the coronavirus, according to a new investigation. Its health officials did not share the coronavirus genome until over a week after scientists in Chinese laboratories decoded it at the beginning of January. Beijing did not warn the World Health Organization that the virus passed between people until two weeks later.

  • After protests shake Brazil, Bolsonaro tries to rein in his backers
    Reuters

    After protests shake Brazil, Bolsonaro tries to rein in his backers

    Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro urged his supporters on Monday to put off their protests against the country's Supreme Court next weekend after counter-demonstrations triggered violent clashes on Sunday. "Leave things alone on Sunday," the right-wing president said, referring to the protests. Bolsonaro's critics say he has undermined democracy by endorsing almost weekly protests against the top court, which authorized an investigation into the president for allegedly interfering with police appointments for personal motives.

  • New York, Denver, Minneapolis: Disturbing videos show vehicles plowing into George Floyd protests across USA
    USA TODAY

    New York, Denver, Minneapolis: Disturbing videos show vehicles plowing into George Floyd protests across USA

    Demonstrators in Denver chased a black SUV after a woman drove through a crowd and accelerated as a man hopped on the hood. A semitruck driver was arrested after video showed the truck driving into a crowd of peaceful demonstrators in Minneapolis on Interstate 35, which had been closed to traffic. Protests broke out around the nation after the killing of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white police officer pinned him to the ground with his knee on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes.

  • Cop in Las Vegas critically wounded, others elsewhere injured in protests
    NBC News

    Cop in Las Vegas critically wounded, others elsewhere injured in protests

    A police officer in Las Vegas was critically wounded as others in New York and St. Louis were also injured during ongoing civil unrest sparked by last week's death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, officials said Tuesday. "This has been a long night for your police department ... and a tragic night for our community," Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters Tuesday. "With these protests, which are leading to riots, one tragedy is only leading to another."

  • George Floyd was killed in a homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression, an independent autopsy found
    INSIDER

    George Floyd was killed in a homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression, an independent autopsy found

    George Floyd died on May 25 of asphyxia due to compression of the neck and back, an independent autopsy found. A video that has sparked outrage across the nation showed a white Minneapolis police officer pinning the handcuffed 46-year-old black man's neck on the ground beneath his knee. The way he was restrained restricted not only "blood flow into his brain, but also airflow into his lungs," said Antonio Romanucci, an attorney working with the Floyd family.

  • Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'
    AFP

    Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'

    The Philippines has told the United States it is suspending its bid to break off a key military pact, the two allies said Tuesday in a sharp turnaround of President Rodrigo Duterte's foreign policy. Duterte in February gave notice to Washington he was axing the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) after accusing the US of interference in his internationally condemned narcotics crackdown. That began a 180-day countdown to ending the deal central to hundreds of joint military exercises with the US per year and a major component of their nearly 70-year-old alliance.

  • Chechen leader accused of mass torture and murder offers Donald Trump human rights advice: ‘End the mayhem’
    The Independent

    Chechen leader accused of mass torture and murder offers Donald Trump human rights advice: ‘End the mayhem’

    Chechnya's gay-purging strongman Ramzan Kadyrov has made an unexpected foray into US politics by suggesting Donald Trump might have a thing or two to learn from him about human rights. In a social media post published early on Tuesday morning, the controversial leader demanded American authorities “put an end” to “mayhem” and “illegal actions against citizens.” “Police are lynching people right on the streets of American cities,” he wrote.

  • Pakistani girl dies of her injuries from Karachi plane crash
    Associated Press

    Pakistani girl dies of her injuries from Karachi plane crash

    A Pakistani girl who was critically injured on the ground last month when a passenger plane went down in a crowded neighborhood of the port city of Karachi has died at a hospital, her relatives and a doctor said Tuesday. Meanwhile, the plane's black box flight recorders were sent to France, where their data was downloaded Tuesday. The Airbus A320 crash killed 97 passengers and crew members; two passengers survived the crash.

  • 8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody
    The New York Times

    8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody

    On May 25, Minneapolis police officers arrested George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, after a deli employee called 911, accusing him of buying cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. Seventeen minutes after the first squad car arrived at the scene, Floyd was unconscious and pinned beneath three police officers, showing no signs of life. The day after Floyd's death, the Police Department fired all four of the officers involved in the episode, and on Friday the Hennepin County attorney, Mike Freeman, announced murder and manslaughter charges against Derek Chauvin, the officer who can be seen most clearly in witness videos pinning Floyd to the ground.

  • China, Russia React to George Floyd Protests
    Newsy

    China, Russia React to George Floyd Protests

    China, Russia and Iran have all weighed in on the U.S. unrest, from denying involvement to comparing the demonstrations to protests in Hong Kong.

  • Online clothing retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees and instead hiring in lower-cost cities like Austin and Minneapolis
    Business Insider

    Online clothing retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees and instead hiring in lower-cost cities like Austin and Minneapolis

    Nick Otto for the Washington Post/Getty Images Online personal styling retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees, or about 18% of its total workforce. The employees affected can stay with the San Francisco-based company if they relocate — Stitch Fix will start hiring for 2,000 positions in lower-cost cities this summer. The company said the layoffs are not related to the pandemic, but the public health crisis has dealt a blow to the retail industry.