Program helping rebuild neighborhoods devastated by North Carolina tornado

Nearly three years after a destructive tornado hit Greensboro, the community is still rebuilding.

Video Transcript

- I wish it was [INAUDIBLE].

- Ask James Glover to take inventory of what that tornado did to his neighborhood.

- [INAUDIBLE] looking out next door right there, right there.

- And he'll give you a rundown.

- About four or five houses on this side here going towards the Cone.

- House.

- That one, that one.

- By house.

- That one, next to them. All these houses, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

- It was April 15 of 2018. A day that certainly taxed this community.

- I've been in the building business since 1982.

- Jim Sandknop was one of the first builders to come in and put tarps on all of the roofs just to keep the water out, until the rebuilding could start.

- He put one on that one, next door, next door, and next door. How are we up there?

- All damaged by the tornado.

- That tornado here.

- The whole East side of Greensboro, from 40 all the way up to the northern side of Cone Boulevard, just simply destroyed. it looked like a war zone.

- Three years later--

- I'm measuring it off.

- They are just now beginning to feel like the sun is shining on this community again.

- We seal in here and here, which keeps any air from coming between the outside seething.

- Sandknop left his for profit business to help New Orleans rebuild after Katrina. When he came back in 2008--

- The housing industry went down.

- It more than went down.

- It crashed, and there wasn't any government help, you know, for housing industry, where there were for banks.

- So he began working for a nonprofit called Community Housing Solutions, which is doing much of the work.

- Just like that.

- We're giving people hope. We're giving them an opportunity. We're giving them a place to turn.

- They're not just rebuilding homes. They're rebuilding lives.

- When I built for profits, I never had a homeowner cry when I give them the keys to their house.

- And they still do.

- I grew up as a sharecroppers daughter.

- Years later.

- And I never had a house. We didn't have a house. We moved every other year, and to be able to buy a house, any kind of house was way over there.

- But with a little help, way over there is where they can live again, because even those houses that just needed repairs were beyond what many of the owners could handle.

- They were more than helpless, and they've been here for 40 or 50 years. They had already paid off their houses. They did not have insurance, because they didn't need to carry insurance.

- The homes they couldn't repair, they tore down and are starting from scratch, like the one Shay Peoples will soon live in.

- That's going to be my bedroom.

- OK.

- And the kitchen.

- This will be her sanctuary.

- Mm-hmm. Beautiful.

- She moved here from Philadelphia back in the '90s when she married Charles, who soon after died from cancer.

- And I lost my husband 20 years ago as of yesterday. So with this home, it is a blessing, and now, I could call it home, for sure, that this state and the city of Greensboro is my home now.

- Because home is not only where the heart is.

- It really is.

- It's where comfort lies. Bob Buckley, Fox 8 News.