Protesters rally against Asian hate across U.S.

From California to New York, demonstrators around the U.S. continued to rally on Saturday in support of the Asian-American community.

It comes in the wake of a shooting rampage at three day spas in Atlanta, Georgia that left eight dead, including six Asian women.

In Atlanta, hundreds gathered outside the Georgia State Capitol building.

Many Asian Americans present said that crimes against them were not being taken seriously.

"Even if I am Asian, I am also American. And in my personal experience I always feel invisible."

Democratic Georgia State representative Bee Nguyen declared it an attack on the Asian community.

"We have lived in the shadows, invisible, overlooked and and relegated as second-class citizens. And now, in the wake of a violent and brutal shooting, white America is still trying to deny our humanity and existence."

Georgia's newly-elected senators Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock also appeared before the crowd.

"I'm not interested in whether or not he had a bad day. Talking about a bad day."

CBS News reported that hundreds of protesters also marched through Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Saturday.

Award-winning actress Sandra Oh made a surprise appearance at that rally.

"Everyone here, I will offer, I will challenge everyone here, if you see something, will you help me?"

This week's killings follows mounting violence against Asian-Americans in the past year.

Community leaders say that's owing to Asian-Americans being blamed for the global health crisis.

After the attacks in Atlanta, 21-year-old Robert Aaron Long was charged with eight counts of homicide.

He said that racial bias was not his motivation, while authorities stressed that they have not ruled out charging him with hate crimes.

Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING, CROWD CHANTING]

- From California to New York, demonstrators around the US continued to rally on Saturday in support of the Asian-American community. It comes in the wake of a shooting rampage at three day spas in Atlanta, Georgia that left eight dead, including six Asian women. In Atlanta, hundreds gathered outside the Georgia State Capitol building. Many Asian-Americans present said that crimes against them were not being taken seriously.

- Even if I am Asian, I am also American. And [INAUDIBLE] my personal experience, I've always been invisible.

- Democratic Georgia State representative Bee Nguyen declared it an attack on the Asian community.

BEE NGUYEN: We have lived in the shadows, invisible, overlooked, stereotyped, and relegated as second-class citizens. And now, in the wake of a violent and brutal shooting, white America is still trying to deny our humanity and existence.

- Georgia's newly-elected senators Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock also appeared before the crowd.

RAPHAEL WARNOCK: I'm not interested in whether or not he had a bad day-- talk about a bad day?

- CBS News reported that hundreds of protesters also marched through Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Saturday.

- (CHANTING) Asian people are welcome here. No hate, no fear--

- Award-winning actress Sandra Oh made a surprise appearance at that rally.

SANDRA OH: Everyone here, I will-- I will offer, I will challenge everyone here, if you see something, will you help me?

- This week's killings follow mounting violence against Asian-Americans in the past year. Community leaders say that's owing to Asian-Americans being blamed for the global health crisis. After the attacks in Atlanta, 21-year-old Robert Aaron Long was charged with eight counts of homicide. He said that racial bias was not his motivation, while authorities [? stress ?] that they have not ruled out charging him with hate crimes.