Queen's Brian May celebrates knighthood: 'Thank you and much love from Sir Bri'

A man with long, curly white hair wearing a black rockstar outfit and playing electric guitar on a foggy stage
Brian May of Queen performs at the 2022 Platinum Jubilee concert in London. (Alberto Pezzali / Associated Press)

All hail Sir Brian May, the latest entertainment luminary to be knighted by the British monarchy.

Over the holiday weekend, King Charles III rang in the new year by knighting several esteemed Britons, including the longtime Queen guitarist, who celebrated his regal new status Friday by sharing a video message to fans on Instagram.

"Thank you so much for all your messages of congratulations following the announcement of my knighthood," May said in the clip.

"I'm very thrilled and very touched by the love that's coming from you and the support. I will do my very best to be worthy. For now, good night and ... much love from Sir Bri."

The 75-year-old rock musician, astrophysicist and animal welfare advocate has received the title of Knight Bachelor "for services to Music and to Charity," according to the Gazette — the official publication of the British royal family.

Other 2023 honorees included artists, healthcare workers, business executives, educators, scientists, philanthropists and members of Parliament. In his Instagram post, May joked that those who "want to be formal" can now refer to him as "Dr Sir Brian Harold May, CBE."

In a recent interview with the Associated Press, the founding member of Queen acknowledged that he already possessed “a certain amount of power in the world, mainly because of music, obviously,” but hoped knighthood would give him "a little bit more clout."

“Maybe a few more people will listen to me than would otherwise, you know, if it’s Sir Brian on the phone,” he quipped.

Now that May is officially a knight, his wife of 22 years, Anita Dobson, can adopt the title of Lady May — which "she's thrilled to bits" about, according to her husband.

"Yes, Lady Anita will be enjoying it,” May told AP. "It makes me feel proud that she gets an honor beside me because God knows I wouldn’t be here without her.”

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.