‘Race Cards’ Helping To Stir Up Difficult Conversations

An organization in Florida is trying to tackle racism by using something called "race cards" to stir up difficult discussions – and some of the inspiration and research comes from Minnesota, reports Elise Preston (1:57). WCCO 4 News At 5:30 - May 2, 2021

Video Transcript

- An organization in Florida is trying to tackle racism by using something called race cards to stir up difficult conversations. As Elise Preston reports, some of the inspiration and research comes from Minnesota.

- Kimberly Allen says she will never forget how she felt after the deadly police shooting of school cafeteria worker, Fernando Castile, in Minnesota in 2016.

KIMBERLY ALLEN: With children in the car, that was just unimaginable, and I would never want my children to see anything like that.

- She started volunteering with a social rights organization 904WARD in Jacksonville, Florida, which uses race cards to provoke raw conversations.

- I don't think that you can really be an effective advocate or ally, until you've had conversations with different people.

- Allen says, questions, such as when did you first become aware of racism, helps participants see other points of view. 904WARD even launched a race card app with the help of a grant from the Mayo Clinic.

- This is a guiding principle for me, and organizationally, this is a guiding value for all of us.

- Dr. Anjali Bhagra considers racism a public health issue, causing physical stress for victims and countless health disparities for black Americans.

- When we talk about social determinants of health, that impacts the prognosis or the health and well-being of a human being more than, like I said, access to medications.

- Allen is now CEO of 904WARD. She's grateful systemic racism is, finally, being addressed in our culture.

- We have to speak to the nature of hope.

- She hopes change will create a better world for her three children. Elise Preston, CBS News, New York.

- Three dozen social justice organizations were awarded grants from the Mayo Clinic. The hospital has pledged $100 million over the next 10 years to address racism.