Rand Paul threatens to block Ukraine-Russia resolution

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Sens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) leave the Senate Chamber following a nomination vote for Robert Califf to be Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, February 15, 2022.
Sens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) leave the Senate Chamber following a nomination vote for Robert Califf to be Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, February 15, 2022.


Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) warned on Thursday that he will block quick passage of a symbolic resolution supporting Ukraine and sending a warning to Russia unless it incorporates changes he wants.

"We have some amendments to it. We believe that it should say nothing in this resolution is to be construed as an authorization of war and nothing in this resolution is to be construed as authorizing the use of troops into Ukraine," Paul said.

Paul said that he offered the amendments to sponsors of the resolution on Wednesday night but they were rejected. He said that he would object to quickly passing the resolution if it doesn't incorporate his amendments.

Because the bipartisan group is trying to pass the resolution by unanimous consent, they need buy-in from every senator to allow the resolution to pass quickly.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) said that he was in talks with Paul.

"We're working through it," Portman said.

Portman and Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), John Cornyn (R-Texas), James Risch (R-Idaho) and Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) offered the resolution.

Beyond offering support for Ukraine, the resolution "denounces the Russian military buildup of over 150,000 troops on Ukraine's border" and signals that President Biden should impose sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine.

"[The Senate] encourages the President that, should any further invasion or other malign activity to undermine the sovereignty of Ukraine occur by Russia, the United States Government should exhaust all tools at its disposal to impose significant costs on the Russian Federation to restore peace in Europe," it states.