Relatives of George Floyd, Eric Garner, Andrew Brown meet with lawmakers, White House officials

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Jon Street
·2 min read
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The relatives of several Black Americans who were killed by police met with lawmakers on Capitol Hill and advisers to President Biden at the White House.

Yocharlakeeta Brown-Floyd, the sister-in-law of George Floyd; Philoise Floyd, George Floyd's brother; and Gwen Carr, the mother of Eric Garner, and members of the family of Andrew Brown were all in attendance.

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Attorneys Benjamin Crump, Monique Pressley, Antonio Romanucci, and Bakari Sellers joined the relatives.

White House Senior Advisor and Director of the Office of Public Engagement Cedric Richmond and White House Domestic Policy Adviser Susan Rice met with the relatives and attorneys.

Just before meeting with Richmond and Rice at the White House, they met with lawmakers from both sides of the aisle.

"They listened very intensely. It got very emotional at times," Crump, the Floyd family lawyer, said of the Capitol Hill meetings.

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"We’re just here to just get our point across and let them know that we’re hurting, we’re still in pain," Philonise Floyd said, according to Bloomberg.

Among the lawmakers present during the Capitol Hill session were Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC), Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), and Rep. Karen Bass (D-CA).

The talks reportedly centered on police reform efforts, which Biden urged Congress to pass by the end of May, the one-year anniversary of George Floyd's death at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.

Scott introduced a police reform bill in 2020, but Democrats rejected the legislation because they said it did not go far enough.

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"I extended an olive branch. I offered them amendments. But Democrats used the filibuster to block the debate from even happening. My friends across the aisle seemed to want the issue... more than they wanted a solution. But I’m still working. I’m still hopeful," Scott said during his GOP response to Biden's joint address to Congress on Wednesday night.

The House of Representatives passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act in March. The bill in its current form, however, is not expected to gain enough bipartisan support in the Senate.