René Redzepi called "Locavore Hero" on cover of 'Time' mgazine

Chef Rene Redzepi is on this week's cover of 'Time' Magazine.

Chef René Redzepi joins the late Julia Child as one of the few chefs to grace the cover of Time magazine.

In nearly every other market except the US -- Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the South Pacific -- Redzepi, chef of the world's best restaurant Noma as deemed by Restaurant magazine, is photographed kneeling in fields of presumably the Danish countryside, the inspiration and ethos behind his cooking.

Dubbed a "Locavore Hero," food writer Lisa Abend gives readers a more intimate look at the man Time magazine credits for "sparking a worldwide culinary revolution" with his insistence on using hyper local ingredients.

Redzepi is known for foraging the wild Danish countryside for many of the ingredients used in his dishes.

Though he may own the best restaurant in the world, Abend begins her portraiture by sharing that the young chef can't afford his own home and rents out an old apartment in Copenhagen for his wife and 4-year-old daughter.

While the Noma chef may wear the locavore hat now, it's a title which was given decades ago to California chef Alice Waters, who was considered the pioneer of the culinary philosophy at her restaurant Chez Panisse.

Last year, Ferran Adrià also graced the Spanish cover of Esquire magazine in a scratch-and-sniff issue meant to smell like his restaurant El Bulli.

The Time story is available online for subscribers. The Redzepi issue is on stands now.

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