Republican leaders Kevin McCarthy and Liz Cheney clash over support for Trump at a press conference

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Eliza Relman
·2 min read
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Liz Cheney Kevin McCarthy
House Republican Caucus Chair Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) at a press briefing with Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-California). AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
  • Simmering divisions within Republican leadership were exposed yet again on Wednesday when leaders were asked about Donald Trump.

  • While House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Rep. Liz Cheney disagreed about whether Trump should speak at an upcoming conservative conference.

  • "I don't believe he should be playing a role in the future of the party or the country," Cheney, the third highest-ranking House Republican, said.

  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Simmering divisions within Republican leadership were exposed yet again on Wednesday when GOP leaders were asked during a press conference whether former President Donald Trump should speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference on Sunday.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy responded simply: "Yes, he should."

But when asked for her opinion, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, who voted to impeach Trump for inciting the deadly mob that breached the Capitol last month, was quick to contradict McCarthy.

"That's up to CPAC," Cheney, the third highest-ranking House Republican, said. "I've been clear in my views about President Trump and the extent to which following January 6 I don't believe he should be playing a role in the future of the party or the country."

McCarthy then abruptly ended the press conference.

"On that high note, thank you very much," he said, sparking laughter. The group of Republican lawmakers quickly disbanded.

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With Trump out of office, Republicans are internally divided over who is leading their party.

"We don't have a leader of the Republican Party," Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, told Insider last month.

Rep. Jim Jordan, one of Trump's biggest boosters in the House, tweeted on Wednesday in response to Cheney's remarks, "President Trump is the leader of the Republican Party." And Donald Trump Jr., the former president's eldest son, attacked Cheney, arguing that her constituents "hate her" and she's angling for a job at CNN.

Read the original article on Business Insider