Republicans say Marjorie Taylor Greene has 'denounced' QAnon, but she defended the conspiracy theory a month after being elected

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Eliza Relman
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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, holds up a "Stop the Steal" mask while speaking with fellow first-term Republican members of Congress on the steps of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 4, 2021.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, holds up a "Stop the Steal" mask while speaking with fellow first-term Republican members of Congress on the steps of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 4, 2021. SAUL LOEB/Getty Images
  • House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy said Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene had privately "denounced" QAnon.

  • Greene falsely said on Thursday that she never discussed QAnon while running for Congress or since being elected.

  • On Dec. 4, Greene tweeted a Gab post defending QAnon and its adherents.

  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said on Wednesday that Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene had privately "denounced" the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory and that she shouldn't be punished for statements she made prior to becoming a member of Congress this year.

In recent years, Greene has promoted QAnon - the convoluted pro-Trump lie - endorsed political violence against Democrats, and made racist, Islamophobic, and anti-Semitic statements, among other controversial remarks.

"They're going to judge her on things that were said, that she has now denounced, before she was ever a member of Congress," McCarthy told reporters on Wednesday night, referring to Democrats' efforts to strip Greene of her House committee assignments. "Nothing that she said has been ... since she's been a member of Congress."

But on December 4, a month after being elected to Congress, Greene shared a blog post by Gab CEO Andrew Torba defending QAnon. In a since-deleted tweet, she called Torba's defense "the first accurate article about people following Q."

"I can't say I've ever seen any 'conspiracy theories' from the QAnon community," Torba wrote in the piece. "In fact, I've seen a refreshing and objective flow of information being surfaced by a decentralized community of millions of people who are researching and reporting on news that so-called 'journalists' refuse to cover."

Greene tweeted, "the Mediacrats smear innocent Americans with conspiracy lies if they don't believe the 'news.'" And she suggested that QAnon followers are "people who refuse to bow to lies."

During her Thursday speech from the House floor, Greene said that she "stopped believing" in QAnon in 2018 when she "started finding misinformation." And she falsely claimed that she never discussed QAnon during her congressional campaign.

"I never once said during my entire campaign, QAnon," Greene said. "I never once said any of the things that I am being accused of today during my campaign. I never said any of these things since I have been elected for Congress."

She concluded her remarks by arguing that the media is "just as guilty as QAnon" for "presenting truth and lies to divide us."

In a 2017 video, Greene called QAnon "a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take this global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles out."

In October, Greene criticized the House resolution condemning QAnon and used air quotes when using the term conspiracy theory to describe it. The then-congressional candidate argued that the House should have also passed a resolution condemning Black Lives Matter and antifa.

Read the original article on Business Insider