Restaurant, Bar Owners Look Toward Unknown As Closure Looms

All restaurants and bars must close their dining rooms by 9 p.m. due to the coronavirus outbreak. CBS 2's Chris Tye reports.

  • Trump demands appreciation from governors for coronavirus response
    Yahoo News

    Trump demands appreciation from governors for coronavirus response

    President Trump used his daily coronavirus briefing to attack Democratic governors who in his estimation had shown insufficient gratitude for his administration's response to the pandemic. “I want them to be appreciative,” Trump said, arguing that failing to show appreciation was insulting not just to him but to the Army Corps of Engineers, which has been part of the federal response to the pandemic. The president said he has told Vice President Mike Pence not to call governors who haven't shown proper deference to his administration.

  • In shadow of coronavirus, Congress contemplates 'one of the biggest rule changes in the last century'
    Yahoo News

    In shadow of coronavirus, Congress contemplates 'one of the biggest rule changes in the last century'

    As the House of Representatives prepares to pass a historic $2 trillion coronavirus relief package, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faces a bigger challenge: figuring out a way for 435 members to cast votes in the time of social distancing. The pandemic has left multiple members of Congress in quarantine and led to restrictions on movement that could prevent the House from voting. While House leadership has indicated they hope to pass the initial coronavirus aid bill quickly using a voice vote, the likely need for further relief and other legislation has led Pelosi to consider new procedures, including measures for remote voting that a report from the House Rules Committee described as “one of the biggest rule changes in the last century.”

  • The mystery behind Germany's low coronavirus death rate
    CBS News

    The mystery behind Germany's low coronavirus death rate

    Compared to other countries, the number of deaths caused by the novel coronavirus in Germany has been surprisingly low. According to the country's federal health agency, The Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the mortality rate is currently at less than 0.5%. Italy has reported more than 86,000 confirmed cases and over 9,000 deaths, which would seem to work out to a mortality rate of roughly 10%.

  • Coronavirus stimulus package: Who will get $1,200 checks and when will they be sent out?
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus stimulus package: Who will get $1,200 checks and when will they be sent out?

    CLARIFICATION: An earlier version of this article contained outdated information on how much money some low-income Americans would receive under the $2 trillion economic recovery package. A late-hour change to the legislation made Americans with little or no tax liability eligible for $1,200 ($2,400 for joint returns). WASHINGTON – The checks are coming.

  • China sends medical aid to Pakistan to combat virus outbreak
    Associated Press

    China sends medical aid to Pakistan to combat virus outbreak

    China sent a plane loaded with medical personnel and supplies Saturday to help Pakistan fight the spread of the coronavirus in one of the world's most populous nations. Across the Middle East and elsewhere, the outbreak has raised concerns that health systems strapped by multiple wars, refugee crises and unstable economies won't be able to handle a growing numbers in cases. Iran is battling the worst outbreak in the region and state TV said Saturday another 139 people had died from the virus.

  • A Wuhan seafood vendor believed to be one of the first coronavirus patients says 'a lot fewer people would have died' if the Chinese government acted sooner
    Business Insider

    A Wuhan seafood vendor believed to be one of the first coronavirus patients says 'a lot fewer people would have died' if the Chinese government acted sooner

    STR/AFP via Getty Images Wei Guixian, a 57-year-old seafood vendor in Wuhan, China, was among the first 27 people to be diagnosed with the coronavirus, which originated from the wet market where she worked. Wei first began exhibiting coronavirus symptoms on December 10 and was admitted to the hospital less than a week later, with doctors describing her illness as "very serious" and "ruthless." Other vendors from the same market began to check into the hospital soon after.

  • Custodian with coronavirus symptoms accuses Harvard of neglect
    NBC News

    Custodian with coronavirus symptoms accuses Harvard of neglect

    When Harvard University students were told to pack their bags, essential workers like Doris Reina-Landaverde remained on campus to disinfect dormitories. Harvard closed its doors March 10 to slow the virus' spread and switched to online classes. In the meantime, custodian Reina-Landaverde continued to show up to work every day with a pair of latex gloves and a mask.

  • Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off
    AFP

    Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off

    Here are the latest developments from Asia related to the novel coronavirus pandemic: - Wuhan eases travel rules - Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the coronavirus first emerged last year, partly reopened on Saturday after more than two months of near total isolation for its population of 11 million. People are now allowed to enter the city but not leave. AFP saw crowds of passengers arriving at Wuhan railway station, most wheeling suitcases alongside them.

  • Pope holds dramatic solitary service for relief from coronavirus
    Reuters

    Pope holds dramatic solitary service for relief from coronavirus

    Pope Francis said the coronavirus had put everyone "in the same boat" as he held a dramatic, solitary prayer service in St. Peter's Square on Friday, urging the world to see the crisis as a test of solidarity and a reminder of basic values. "Thick darkness has gathered over our squares, our streets and our cities," he said, speaking from the steps of St. Peter's Basilica into an eerily empty and rainy square before delivering an extraordinary "Urbi et Orbi" (to the city and the world) blessing - something he normally does only twice a year. The Vatican called the service "An Extraordinary Prayer in the Time of Pandemic," a sombre echo of an announcement by Italian officials minutes earlier that the coronavirus death toll in the country had surged past 9,000.

  • China threatens to strike back after Taiwan deal
    Yahoo News Video

    China threatens to strike back after Taiwan deal

    China has denounced a U.S. act that increases American support for Taiwan internationally.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy

    A large majority of Americans disagree with President Trump that the nation's battle against the coronavirus is winding down and that normal economic activity should resume sooner rather than later, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll — and that divide appears to be eroding public trust in Trump's leadership during the pandemic. As the virus continues to spread exponentially — the U.S. now leads the world in cases, with more than 85,000 — the poll found that 59 percent of Americans think that Easter, which falls on April 12, is too soon to “open the country up for business,” even though the president has repeatedly said he hopes to do just that.

  • Bloomberg

    Tom Coburn, Republican ‘Dr. No’ to Senate Democrats, Dies at 72

    The Oklahoma congressman, who served three terms in the House of Representatives and two in the Senate, became a symbol of Republican obstructionism, earning him the nickname “Dr. No” for stymieing the legislative process. Then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat who frequently locked horns with Coburn, resorted to assembling more than 30 unrelated measures that Coburn had blocked, which he packaged into a single bill, dubbed the “Tomnibus.” From abortion rights to mandatory employer-sponsored health-care insurance for workers, Coburn was seen by Democrats as a policy roadblock and by Republicans as a white knight to American taxpayers.

  • Coronavirus lockdowns: These states are ordering residents to stay home or shelter in place
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus lockdowns: These states are ordering residents to stay home or shelter in place

    A growing number of states and counties across the nation are cracking down on residents' movements amid the spread of the coronavirus – a new normal that's led to more than 100 million Americans being ordered to stay home. It will go into effect Saturday and runs until April 10 at 5:00 p.m. The order was based on models released by the Minnesota Department of Health and University of Minnesota that predicted more than 70,000 residents could die if no action was taken.

  • Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages
    Popular Mechanics

    Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages

    No money required—all you need is a printer and some colored pencils. From Popular Mechanics

  • One chart shows how much cash you should expect from the coronavirus stimulus based on your salary
    Business Insider

    One chart shows how much cash you should expect from the coronavirus stimulus based on your salary

    REUTERS/Tom Brenner The Senate passed a $2 trillion stimulus bill to help support the country's economy during the coronavirus pandemic, with the House of Representatives set to vote on the bill Friday morning. The bill would involve the government sending most Americans a personal check to help prop up households amid the economic disruption. Business Insider created a chart to show how much money Americans would receive from the relief package based on their income.

  • Stimulus checks are coming — here's how to make sure you get yours quickly
    NBC News

    Stimulus checks are coming — here's how to make sure you get yours quickly

    Consumers eager to receive their stimulus checks from the government's historic coronavirus aid package need to make sure they are up to date on their taxes. Once the stimulus measure is passed by the House and signed into law, distributions would come via the IRS, which would use 2019 taxpayer forms to determine how much a person's check should be and where it should be sent. If 2019 taxes have yet to be filed, the IRS would use information from taxpayers' 2018 forms.

  • In Iran, false belief a poison fights virus kills hundreds
    Associated Press

    In Iran, false belief a poison fights virus kills hundreds

    Standing over the still body of an intubated 5-year-old boy wearing nothing but a plastic diaper, an Iranian health care worker in a hazmat suit and mask begged the public for just one thing: Stop drinking industrial alcohol over fears about the new coronavirus. The boy, now blind after his parents gave him toxic methanol in the mistaken belief it protects against the virus, is just one of hundreds of victims of an epidemic inside the pandemic now gripping Iran. Iranian media report nearly 300 people have been killed and more than 1,000 sickened so far by ingesting methanol across the Islamic Republic, where drinking alcohol is banned and where those who do rely on bootleggers.

  • Italy, Spain suffer record virus deaths as British PM tests positive
    AFP

    Italy, Spain suffer record virus deaths as British PM tests positive

    Italy on Friday recorded the most daily deaths of any country since the start of the coronavirus pandemic and Spain had its deadliest day, as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson became the first major world leader to test positive. Italy reported 969 new deaths, Spain 769 and France 299 as Europe reeled from a crisis that led the United States on Friday to finalise an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus package. In other grim milestones, AFP tallies showed more than 26,000 deaths worldwide, and a total of 300,000 cases now recorded in Europe, after the United States overtook China as the country with the most infections.

  • Honeymoon on lockdown: newlyweds' cruise goes awry over coronavirus
    Reuters

    Honeymoon on lockdown: newlyweds' cruise goes awry over coronavirus

    Newlyweds Yadira Garza and Joel Gonzalez began their honeymoon cruise on the MS Zaandam with romantic strolls overlooking the sea, but have now spent days in a stuffy, cramped cabin as the ship goes on lockdown to contain coronavirus. Four "older guests" have died on the ship in recent days, cruise operator Holland America Line said without providing details, while more than 130 people aboard are suffering from influenza-like symptoms. Two of them have tested positive for coronavirus.

  • The mistakes that turned New York into an epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic
    Yahoo News

    The mistakes that turned New York into an epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic

    Out of the three of them, unfortunately, he has been the worst in taking decisive action,” New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams says of de Blasio. In a recent conversation with Yahoo News, he struggled to find words to describe the inadequacy of Trump's response, but was hardly more generous to de Blasio, with whom he shares a near-identical political outlook. Freddi Goldstein, a spokeswoman for City Hall, countered such claims in an email to Yahoo News.

  • A 90-year-old woman in Washington state recovered from the coronavirus, and she credits family, God, and potato soup
    INSIDER

    A 90-year-old woman in Washington state recovered from the coronavirus, and she credits family, God, and potato soup

    The Family of Geneva Wood Geneva Wood had a stroke in December that left her recovering in a Washington state nursing home. Last month, Life Care Center at Kirkland went on lockdown after several of its residents were diagnosed with the new coronavirus. Wood, who was one of them, was hospitalized and declined ventilation.

  • Neanderthals didn't just hunt mammoths. They actually knew how to fish, researchers discover.
    USA TODAY

    Neanderthals didn't just hunt mammoths. They actually knew how to fish, researchers discover.

    In fact, over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals were feeding themselves regularly on fish and other marine life. Filled with fish bones and crustacean shells that researchers know were left behind by Neanderthals, the cave "provides the first record of significant marine resource consumption among Europe's Neanderthals," according to the study. The new study reveals fishing and shellfish gathering contributed significantly to the subsistence economy of the Neanderthals.

  • Now That Canada Is Rationing Masks, Trudeau Faces Backlash for Donating Medical Supplies to China
    National Review

    Now That Canada Is Rationing Masks, Trudeau Faces Backlash for Donating Medical Supplies to China

    Canada's Official Opposition Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer took aim at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for shipping tons of medical supplies to China in February, calling the move “outrageous” with current concerns that Canada is running short on supplies amid its own fight against coronavirus. Drs. across the country are facing urgent shortages of critical supplies.

  • A Connecticut doctor has been charged after authorities said he deliberately coughed on his coworkers
    Business Insider

    A Connecticut doctor has been charged after authorities said he deliberately coughed on his coworkers

    A Connecticut doctor was arrested on suspicion of coughing and hugging two co-workers in spite of social distancing measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus. Cory Edgar, 48, was charged with a breach of peace misdemeanor, according to local news outlets. A doctor at the University of Connecticut Health Center was arrested and charged with a misdemeanor for coughing and hugging coworkers, local news outlets reported.

  • Catholics allowed to eat meat on Lenten Fridays
    NBC News

    Catholics allowed to eat meat on Lenten Fridays

    Some Roman Catholic bishops around the country are relieving the faithful of giving up meat on Fridays since they're already deprived of some foods and other pleasures during the coronavirus pandemic. During Lent, the about six weeks between Ash Wednesday to Holy Thursday, many Catholics practice self-denial and sacrifice as they repent their sins and pray in preparation for Easter. Some choose certain pleasures to give up for the full 40 days, and all Christians are instructed not to eat meat on Ash Wednesday, and all Fridays during Lent in addition to Good Friday.