Restaurants Offer Free Lunches During COVID-19 School Closures

WCCO's Jason DeRusha is compiling a list of free lunch options while schools are closed statewide (0:48). WCCO 4 News - March 16, 2020

  • Trump sees 'hard days' ahead in coronavirus fight, with as many as 240,000 Americans dead
    Yahoo News

    Trump sees 'hard days' ahead in coronavirus fight, with as many as 240,000 Americans dead

    Nearly a quarter million people in the United States could die as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, Trump administration officials said Tuesday. In what was presented as a best case scenario in which millions of citizens across the country adhered to intensive social distancing guidelines promoted by the Trump administration, between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans are still expected to be killed by COVID-19. “We're going to do everything we can to get [the U.S. death toll] significantly below that,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, whose forthright manner has made him a star of the coronavirus briefings.

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • An evangelical pastor who was charged after holding in-person church services says he doesn't like livestreams because he can't touch parishioners
    INSIDER

    An evangelical pastor who was charged after holding in-person church services says he doesn't like livestreams because he can't touch parishioners

    Tony Spell, an evangelical pastor at the Life Tabernacle Church in suburban Baton Rouge, Louisiana, faces six misdemeanor charges after continuing in-person church services despite the state's stay-at-home order. Spell has held several services with hundreds of people in attendance over the last several weeks, and on Tuesday hosted 300 people after being charged with violating the governor's order that bans large gatherings. As many churches turn to live streams to protect parishioners from the novel coronavirus, Spell told Insider he prefers in-person services, where he can "lay hands" on his congregation.

  • Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault
    Associated Press

    Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault

    One of the motorcyclists in a crash that killed him and six fellow bikers on a north woods highway was drunk and actually was the one who hit a pickup and caused the accident, the lawyer for the truck driver charged with homicide said in a document made public Tuesday. A New Hampshire State Police account of the June 21 crash in the community of Randolph “was deeply flawed," the lawyer for truck driver Volodymyr Zhukovskyy, 24, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a motion filed Friday that seeks a hearing to set him free on bail. State police initially determined that the flatbed trailer he was hauling was 1 1/2 feet over the center line at the time of impact, the motion said.

  • 'Sailors do not need to die': Captain of aircraft carrier hit by coronavirus outbreak begs Navy for more help
    Business Insider

    'Sailors do not need to die': Captain of aircraft carrier hit by coronavirus outbreak begs Navy for more help

    The commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, which was forced into port in Guam because of a coronavirus outbreak, said in a letter to the Navy on Monday that "the spread of the disease is ongoing and accelerating." The commanding officer of a deployed aircraft carrier hit by a coronavirus outbreak is pleading with the US Navy for help, pushing the service to isolate all crew members off the ship, the San Francisco Chronicle reported on Tuesday. The Navy had reported three coronavirus cases aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt last Tuesday, and the number of cases spiked to more than 30 by Friday, Fox News reported at the time.

  • Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus
    Yahoo News Video

    Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus

    On Wednesday Iran warned the U.S. it was “warmongering during the coronavirus outbreak,” after it deployed Patriot air defense missiles to Iraq.

  • One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus
    NBC News

    One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus

    While officials from Montreal to Moscow have placed populations under some form of lockdown designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, one man continues to hold firm to the notion that the rest of the world has lost its mind: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. “It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees!” Lukashenko told a Belarusian television reporter Saturday when asked whether the coronavirus could stop him from hitting the rink for a propaganda-filled hockey game. Lukashenko, one of the longest-serving leaders in the former Soviet Union, has been in power for over 25 years.

  • Israel's Netanyahu back in isolation after minister gets coronavirus
    Reuters

    Israel's Netanyahu back in isolation after minister gets coronavirus

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is returning to self-isolation for another six days after his health minister was diagnosed with coronavirus, the premier's office said on Thursday. Netanyahu, 70, the nation's longest-serving leader, had just ended a two-day period of isolation on Wednesday night after a parliamentary aide was diagnosed with the disease. Litzman, 71, has appeared regularly alongside the premier to give coronavirus updates.

  • Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling
    AFP

    Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling

    Zhang took his elderly father to a Wuhan hospital for a surgical procedure in January, just as coronavirus was consuming the central Chinese city. Devastated and angry, Zhang is now demanding answers from a government that he accuses of incompetence and lying about the extent of the virus. Zhang says he has linked online with dozens of other people whose grief over lost loved ones is paired with anger.

  • Bloomberg

    The FBI Can’t Be Trusted With the Surveillance of Americans

    On Tuesday, the Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz issued a new report that found systematic errors of fact in the FBI's applications for warrants under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The memo does not speak to the materiality or significance of those errors — but they are startling nonetheless. Out of 42 applications, the report says, 39 included major defects.

  • Kellyanne Conway Keeps Attacking Joe Biden for Staying Inside
    The Daily Beast

    Kellyanne Conway Keeps Attacking Joe Biden for Staying Inside

    While leaders across the country are urging Americans to stay in their homes to stop the spread of the coronavirus, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway is openly mocking former Vice President Joe Biden for setting that example. During a press gaggle outside the White House, Conway called it “completely unhelpful” to have the former vice president “in his bunker in Wilmington just lobbing criticisms” at the current president.

  • Bill Gates explains 3 steps the U.S. should take now to make up for lost time on COVID-19
    The Week

    Bill Gates explains 3 steps the U.S. should take now to make up for lost time on COVID-19

    Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates says there is "no question the United States missed the opportunity to get ahead of the novel coronavirus," and there are three steps that must be taken now in order to soften the blow to the economy and slow the number of deaths. In an op-ed for The Washington Post published Tuesday, Gates said there has to be "a consistent nationwide approach to shutting down." It could take at least 10 weeks to get the number of COVID-19 coronavirus cases down, he said, and until then, "no one can continue business as usual or relax the shutdown."

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • How the coronavirus death toll compares to other pandemics, including SARS, HIV, and the Black Death
    Business Insider

    How the coronavirus death toll compares to other pandemics, including SARS, HIV, and the Black Death

    The viral illness is extremely contagious, and spreads from person to person easily through close contact. The most severe coronavirus cases (20%) often include difficulty breathing, and may require hospitalization, where patients may be hooked up to ventilators, which help blow more oxygen into a person's lungs. The novel coronavirus has already killed more than 3,000 people in China, 9,000 in Spain, 12,000 in Italy, and it isn't done yet.

  • Gun background checks smash records amid coronavirus fears
    Associated Press

    Gun background checks smash records amid coronavirus fears

    Background checks required to buy firearms have spiked to record numbers in the past month, fueled by a run on guns from Americans worried about their safety during the coronavirus crisis. According to figures from the FBI, 3.7 million background checks were done in March — the most for a single month since the system began in 1998. Background checks are the key barometer of gun sales, but the FBI's monthly figures also incorporate checks for firearm permits that are required in some states.

  • Coronavirus: Stock markets suffer worst quarter since 1987
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Stock markets suffer worst quarter since 1987

    Stock markets around the world suffered historic losses in the first three months of the year amid a massive sell-off tied to the coronavirus. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and London's FTSE 100 saw their biggest quarterly drops since 1987, plunging 23% and 25% respectively. The S&P 500 lost 20% during the quarter, its worst since 2008.

  • Reuters

    Top EU court says eastern states broke law by refusing to host refugees

    The European Union's top court ruled on Thursday that Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic had broken the law by refusing to host refugees to help ease the burden on southern states such as Greece and Italy after a surge in migrant arrivals from 2015. The ruling underscores Europe's bitter divisions over migration, though the three ex-communist nations face no immediate penalty as the relocation of tens of thousands of people agreed by the EU was only envisaged until 2017. "By refusing to comply with the temporary mechanism for the relocation of applicants for international protection, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic have failed to fulfil their obligations under European Union law," the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union said in its ruling.

  • Serbia sets the stage for Beijing's mask diplomacy
    AFP

    Serbia sets the stage for Beijing's mask diplomacy

    When six Chinese doctors landed in Belgrade two weeks ago, Serbia's president greeted them with elbow-bumps before laying a kiss on their country's flag, a gesture of gratitude that sent Chinese social media aflutter. For weeks China has been showering European countries with millions of face masks, test kits and other aid, recasting itself as the hero in the battle against coronavirus. EU officials have started to warn against a Beijing propaganda campaign -- spun through the "politics of generosity" -- that is distorting China's initial missteps in managing a contagion that started on its soil and has now killed more than 40,000 people across the globe.

  • Dr Fauci: security reportedly expanded as infectious disease expert faces threats
    The Guardian

    Dr Fauci: security reportedly expanded as infectious disease expert faces threats

    Security for Dr Anthony Fauci, the 79-year-old infectious disease expert who has become a calm, reassuring foil to Donald Trump at coronavirus briefings, has been expanded, according to multiple reports. While Fauci's straight talk and willingness to gently correct the president's outrageous exaggerations has drawn admiration from late-night talkshow hosts, professional basketball players and doughnut shop owners alike, the doctor has received threats and unwelcome communications from both critics and fervent admirers. At a coronavirus taskforce briefing at the White House on Wednesday, Fauci declined to comment on whether he was receiving security protection, deferring to the health department's inspector general.

  • Mnuchin reverses course, won't force seniors to file tax return for coronavirus stimulus check
    NBC News

    Mnuchin reverses course, won't force seniors to file tax return for coronavirus stimulus check

    The Trump administration backtracked Wednesday evening on new rules for getting stimulus checks, saying Social Security recipients won't have to file a tax return to receive a payment. The move is a response to pressure from elderly Americans and senators to rescind guidance issued Monday that said seniors needed to file a return to get the checks of up to $1,200, even if they weren't ordinarily required to file taxes. "We want to ensure that our senior citizens, individuals with disabilities, and low-income Americans receive Economic Impact Payments quickly and without undue burden," said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

  • 'We are on the verge of a massive collapse': Ex-Energy Secretary Perry says COVID-19 will ravage oil industry
    USA TODAY

    'We are on the verge of a massive collapse': Ex-Energy Secretary Perry says COVID-19 will ravage oil industry

    Former Energy Secretary Rick Perry believes that the oil industry could collapse because of the dramatic decrease in demand worldwide caused by the coronavirus outbreak and a steep decline in prices. "I'm telling you, we are on the verge of a massive collapse of an industry that we worked awfully hard, over the course of the last three or four years, to build up to the number one oil and gas producing country in the world, giving Americans some affordable energy resources." Coupled with a dispute between Saudi Arabia and Russia that has resulted in an oil surplus, the price for crude as well as gasoline has plunged.

  • PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops

    A Pennsylvania man “extremely upset” about losing his job amidst the coronavirus pandemic allegedly shot his girlfriend, before turning the gun on himself in an attempted murder-suicide, authorities said Wednesday. The Wilson Borough Police Department said in a statement to The Daily Beast that Roderick Bliss IV, 38, attempted to fatally shoot his girlfriend with a semi-automatic pistol on Monday afternoon, before dying by suicide, after he “had become increasingly upset over the COVID-19 pandemic. The 43-year-old girlfriend, who was shot once in the back, survived the attack and is in St. Luke's hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

  • Countries, cities, and health authorities all over the world are suddenly reconsidering their advice that masks don't protect against the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    Countries, cities, and health authorities all over the world are suddenly reconsidering their advice that masks don't protect against the coronavirus

    Romeo Ranoco/Reuters Health authorities are reconsidering their guidance that told most people not to wear masks during the coronavirus outbreak. While health bodies across Europe and the US had told people not to wear masks unless they had symptoms or were treating the infected The WHO and US CDC are now reconsidering, while others have already gone further. Austria and Israel have announced new rules requiring people to cover their faces outside.

  • Woodworking Can Bring Solace in Times of Uncertainty
    Popular Mechanics

    Woodworking Can Bring Solace in Times of Uncertainty

    When things get stressful, it's worth slowing down and appreciating the simpler things. From Popular Mechanics

  • Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone

    As the world economy enters an unprecedented crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and policymakers in Washington and other global capitals prepare record fiscal stimulus plans, stakeholders should heed an important lesson from the last financial downturn in 2008: Recovery is only possible through coordinated global action. A little more than 10 years ago, as the world was entering the Great Recession, stakeholders had to look far back in the rearview mirror to the Great Depression for policy guidance. While the actions of the 1930s did offer important lessons for 2008 — most notably the need to expand the money supply — the economy of the 1930s was fundamentally different than the global economy of the early part of this century.