Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Facebook must disclose app records for Massachusetts probe, judge rules

Facebook Inc has been ordered by a Massachusetts judge to turn over material to the state's attorney general about thousands of apps that the social media company suspected may have misused customer data. In a decision made public on Friday, Massachusetts Superior Court Justice Brian Davis said Attorney General Maura Healey had demonstrated a "substantial need" for the material, as she investigates Facebook's privacy practices.

U.S. census to kick off in remote Alaska Native village

This year's once-a-decade official U.S. national population count will start in a small Alaska Native village perched on the tundra overlooking the Bering Sea. Daytime temperatures will be well below freezing. The 2020 U.S. census is due to launch on Tuesday in Toksook Bay, a Yup'ik hamlet about 500 miles (800 km) west of Anchorage, the state's largest city. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham himself is scheduled to conduct the first in-home interview, with an elder chosen by the local tribe.

Prominent lawyers Starr, Dershowitz join Trump impeachment team

Former independent counsel Ken Starr, who paved the way for the impeachment of Democratic President Bill Clinton in 1998, and prominent lawyer Alan Dershowitz will join President Donald Trump's impeachment trial defense team, Trump's legal team and a source said on Friday. The team will be led by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Trump private attorney Jay Sekulow. Trump adviser Pam Bondi and former independent counsel Robert Ray will also be on the team, according to the source who is familiar with the team's composition.

Children, young adults cannot sue U.S. government over climate change: ruling

A U.S. federal appeals court on Friday threw out a lawsuit by children and young adults who claimed they had a constitutional right to be protected from climate change, in a major setback to efforts to spur the U.S. government to address the issue. In a 2-1 decision, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the plaintiffs, who were between the ages of 8 and 19 when the lawsuit began in 2015, lacked legal standing to sue the United States.

After base shooting, Pentagon restricts foreign trainee access to guns

The Pentagon announced on Friday new restrictions on international military students' access to guns on U.S. bases, as well as other measures, after a Saudi officer killed three U.S. sailors at a Florida naval base last month. "Getting back to work does not mean getting back to business as usual. Going forward we will put several new policies and security procedures in place," Garry Reid, a senior Pentagon intelligence official, said in a statement.

Ahead of tinder box Virginia gun rally, Trump says Constitution under attack

President Donald Trump took aim at Virginia Democrats and their push to stiffen the state's gun laws, saying that the U.S. Constitution was under attack just as thousands of armed militia members began arriving in Richmond for a Monday gun rally. Trump doubled down with his support of gun enthusiasts in the state, which Hilary Clinton won in 2016 and where Democrats took full control of the state legislature for the first time in a generation in November, as candidates made passing stronger gun control laws a central campaign theme.

U.S. to screen passengers for new China coronavirus at three airports

The United States will begin screening efforts at three U.S. airports to detect travelers from the central Chinese city of Wuhan who may have symptoms of a new respiratory virus that so far has killed two people and infected 45 more, public health officials said on Friday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said the screening at the San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles airports would begin on Friday and focus on travelers to the United States via direct or connecting flights from Wuhan.

Teachers doused in jet fuel at California school sue Delta Air Lines

Four Los Angeles-area schoolteachers who were doused with jet fuel dumped by a Delta Air Lines plane in the minutes before it made an emergency landing sued the airline on Friday, accusing the flight crew of negligence. The plaintiffs say the pilot of the Delta Flight 89, which took off from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on Tuesday bound for Shanghai, failed to follow proper procedures in dumping thousands of pounds of fuel over a densely populated area at relatively low altitude.

U.S. will work to determine if ex-ambassador Yovanovitch was under threat -Pompeo

The U.S. State Department will do everything necessary to determine whether former U.S. ambassador Marie Yovanovitch was under threat in Ukraine, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Friday. Documents released this week indicated Lev Parnas, a Ukraine-born U.S. citizen, helped U.S. President Donald Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani investigate U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

Former U.S. congressman Collins sentenced to 26 months for insider trading

Chris Collins, a former U.S. congressman from New York who was an early backer of President Donald Trump, was sentenced to 26 months in prison and fined $200,000 on Friday after pleading guilty to taking part in an insider trading scheme. Before the sentence was handed down, Collins, 69, said in highly emotional remarks to the judge that he felt his life was over and that he was still ashamed to see his former constituents after pleading guilty to charges of conspiracy and making false statements last October.