Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Migrant caravan gathers on Guatemala border to enter Mexico en masse

Hundreds of Central Americans gathered on the Guatemala-Mexico border on Sunday, aiming to cross en masse early on Monday in what could prove a stiff test of the Mexican government's pledge to satisfy U.S. demands to curb migrant flows. President Donald Trump has threatened to hurt Mexico and Central American countries economically if they allow large numbers to reach the U.S. border. U.S. border agents have tracked the latest exodus from Honduras this week.

Democrat Bloomberg vows to narrow wealth gap for black Americans

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg on Sunday pledged to narrow the wealth gap between black and white Americans by boosting black ownership of homes and businesses and investing in poor neighborhoods. Bloomberg, a late entry to the Democratic nomination contest, is rising in public opinion polls as he uses his vast personal fortune to spend heavily on advertising nationwide.

Two Hawaii police officers shot dead, gunman at large

Two police officers in Hawaii were fatally shot by an assailant who remained at large on Sunday in a residential neighborhood not far from busy Waikiki Beach on the island of Oahu, officials and local media said. "Our entire state mourns the loss of two Honolulu Police officers killed in the line of duty this morning," Hawaii Governor David Ige said in a statement.

Pompeo expresses outrage to Sisi over death of U.S. citizen

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo expressed outrage during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi over the "pointless and tragic death" of detained U.S. citizen Moustafa Kassem in Egypt, a U.S. official said on Sunday. The United States on Monday confirmed the death of Egyptian-American Kassem in a prison in Egypt, where he had been in custody since 2013, and vowed to continue to raise concerns over Cairo's human rights record.

Supreme Court to hear Trump appeal in Obamacare contraception fight

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday took up an appeal by President Donald Trump's administration seeking to enforce new federal rules allowing employers to obtain religious exemptions from an Obamacare requirement that health insurance that they provide to employees pays for women's birth control. At issue is a challenge by the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey to the administration's 2018 rule that permits broad religious and moral exemptions to the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate and expands accommodations already allowed under the 2010 law dubbed Obamacare. The administration has asked the Supreme Court to reverse a nationwide injunction issued by a lower court blocking the rule from taking effect.

In impeachment document, Democrats say Trump endangers security, Trump denies

Democratic U.S. lawmakers leading the impeachment case against Republican President Donald Trump said on Saturday the president must be removed from office to protect national security and preserve the country’s system of government. In a 111-page document filed before Trump's Senate trial begins in earnest on Tuesday, the lawmakers laid out their arguments supporting charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress against the president.

Virginia's top House Republican warns "white supremacist garbage" to stay away from gun rally

Virginia's House Republican leader said on Saturday that white supremacists and any other groups trying to spread "hate, violence, or civil unrest" were not welcome at a pro-gun rally in the state's capital on Monday, which is expected to draw thousands. The House Republican leader's statement came a day after the state's top court upheld a ban by the governor on weapons in the area around the Capitol in Richmond where the rally is set to take place by demonstrators protesting against Democrats' push to stiffen the state's gun laws.

National Archives removes exhibit that altered images of Women's March

The U.S. National Archives, home to foundational documents such as the Bill of Rights, apologized on Saturday for altering images critical of President Donald Trump at an exhibit on women's fight for voting rights and said it had removed the display. The entrance to the Washington exhibit had featured interlaced photographs of a 1913 women's suffrage march and the Women's March that took place on Jan. 21, 2017, each visible from a different angle. In the 2017 photograph, the word "Trump" had been blurred in at least two signs carried by demonstrators, including one that originally read "God Hates Trump."

Vows of peace, fears of violence at Virginia gun rally

The top Republican in Virginia's lower house said that any group planning to incite violence at a large gun rights rally on Monday in Richmond should stay home, while far-right leaders of militias planning to attend swore they were coming in peace. Richmond was braced on Sunday for the rally, aimed at showing gun enthusiasts' disdain for swift moves the newly Democrat-controlled legislature is making to pass stiffer gun laws - and many residents feared a repeat of violence seen at a white supremacist rally in nearby Charlottesville in 2017.

'Simply a lie,' Biden accuses Sanders campaign of releasing 'doctored' video

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden accused rival Bernie Sanders's campaign on Saturday of disseminating a "doctored" video edited to falsely appear to show the former vice president supporting cutting Social Security, and called on the Sanders campaign to disown it. In response, Sanders' campaign refused to back down and continued to cite the video as evidence that Biden wants to limit the government-run retirement and disability program.