Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. homeland security proposes face scans for citizens

The Trump administration intends to propose a regulation next year that would require all travelers - including U.S. citizens - to be photographed when entering or leaving the United States, according to the administration's regulatory agenda. The proposed regulation, slated to be issued in July by the Homeland Security Department, would be part of a broader system to track travelers as they enter and exit the United States.

Trump re-election campaign to deny credentials to Bloomberg News reporters

President Donald Trump's re-election campaign said on Monday it will no longer issue press credentials to reporters working for Bloomberg News, the agency owned by Democratic presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg. The news agency said following Bloomberg's announcement of his presidential bid that it would no longer critically cover the Democratic presidential candidates - including Bloomberg and his rivals - but would go on covering Trump.

Officer stabbed, student shot in altercation at Wisconsin high school: police

A Wisconsin high school student on Tuesday stabbed a school resource officer, who responded by shooting the teenager, police said, in the second such incident over the last two days in the state. Oshkosh West High School, about 85 miles (137 km) north of Milwaukee, was put on lockdown after the altercation, Oshkosh Chief of Police Dean Smith said during a news conference.

New York gave homeless 'offer they can't refuse,' New Jersey mayor's lawsuit claims

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka's administration has sued New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, accusing the fellow Democrat of dumping his city's population of homeless people on New Jersey's biggest city. The lawsuit accuses the de Blasio administration's Special One-Time Assistance, or SOTA, program of using strong-arm tactics to send people across the Hudson River to find a place to live.

U.S. shoppers, mostly online, spend 16% more over holiday weekend

A record number of U.S. consumers spent more online and in stores over the holiday weekend for everything from clothing to toys, the National Retail Federation said on Tuesday. NRF's survey found nearly 190 million people made purchases over the five-day holiday shopping period from Thanksgiving Day through Cyber Monday, an increase of roughly 14% from 165 million a year ago. It cited a healthy economy and a condensed holiday shopping season.

PG&E failed to inspect transmission lines that caused deadly 2018 wildfire: state probe

Bankrupt California power producer PG&E Corp did not properly inspect and replace transmission lines before a faulty wire sparked a wildfire that killed more than 80 people in 2018, a probe by a state regulator has concluded. The Caribou-Palermo transmission line was identified as the cause of the Camp Fire last year, which virtually incinerated the Northern California town of Paradise and stands as the state's most lethal blaze.

U.S. regions hard hit by opioids to ditch class action, pursue own lawsuits

Local governments in regions hard hit by the U.S. opioid epidemic have opted out of massive litigation taking aim at the drug industry over the crisis, potentially weakening a novel legal mechanism created to help settle thousands of lawsuits. Overall, 98% of some 34,000 local governments agreed to be bound by a class action against companies such as drug distributor McKesson Corp, drugmaker Johnson & Johnson and pharmacy chain Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc, according to a Monday court filing.

Jeffrey Epstein's sexual abuses began by 1985, targeted 13-year-old, lawsuit claims

Financier Jeffrey Epstein's sexual abuse of girls and young women began as early as 1985 and targeted victims as young as 13 years old, according to a lawsuit filed on Tuesday by nine accusers against his estate. The accusers, known as Jane Doe I through Jane Doe IX, are among more than 20 women so far to formally seek compensation from Epstein's $577 million estate, after he killed himself on Aug. 10 in a Manhattan jail cell.

U.S. senators call for banning, prosecuting ‘slumlords’ of military housing

U.S. senators on Tuesday demanded the Defense Department crack down on private landlords who provide substandard housing at military bases with criminal prosecutions or contract cancellations, citing Reuters reports of slum-like living conditions and falsified accounting. The top civilian and military leaders of the Army, Navy and Air Force appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee, in the latest hearing addressing substandard military housing.

U.S. Supreme Court leans toward BP unit in Montana Superfund case

U.S. Supreme Court justices on Tuesday appeared inclined to shield a unit of British oil major BP Plc from claims seeking a more extensive cleanup of a Superfund hazardous waste site in Montana than what federal environmental officials had ordered. The nine justices heard arguments in an appeal by Atlantic Richfield Co of a Montana state court ruling allowing a group of private landowners within the sprawling site of its former Anaconda copper smelter in western Montana to bring their claims for restoration damages to trial.