Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. CDC recommends against using vapes with marijuana ingredient

People should stop using e-cigarettes with marijuana ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), U.S. public health officials recommended on Friday as investigation on outbreak of lung illness linked to vaping deepens. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has previously warned on vaping, but its latest recommendation focused on THC products after nationwide data pointed to a large number of cases related to the use of the high-inducing component of marijuana.

U.S. judge blocks Trump rule on migrant child detention

A U.S. judge on Friday blocked a Trump administration rule that would have allowed indefinite detention of migrant families, saying it was inconsistent with a decades-old court settlement that governs conditions for migrant children in U.S. custody. The 1997 settlement agreement, which originated in 1985 with a complaint brought on behalf of 15-year-old Salvadoran immigrant Jenny L. Flores, set standards for humane treatment of children in detention and ordered their prompt release in most cases.

Equestrian: Horses take the ferry for show-jumping event on New York island

You can lead a horse to water but can you make 95 of them board a ferry from Lower Manhattan to an island in the middle of the New York Harbor? The answer, thankfully for the organizers of this weekend's Longines Global Champions Tour show-jumping competition on New York City's Governors Island, is yes.

Trump signs into law stopgap U.S. federal funding through November 21

U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday signed a stopgap government funding bill into law to keep the government open through Nov. 21. The law averts a brutal government funding battle amid an impeachment inquiry into the president by the U.S. House of Representatives.

Stormy Daniels settles lawsuit over arrest at Ohio strip club

Porn star Stormy Daniels has settled a lawsuit against the city of Columbus, Ohio, for $450,000, receiving the payout after she charged that police arrested at a strip club in retaliation for her claim that she had an affair with Donald Trump. Columbus police arrested her during her performance at the Sirens Gentlemen's Club on a misdemeanor sex offense for touching three customers who were undercover vice detectives. The charge was dropped hours later.

U.S. labor judge rules that Tesla broke labor law

Electric carmaker Tesla Inc interfered with legitimate union organizing and must read a notice to workers explaining their rights in a meeting requiring attendance from Chief Executive Elon Musk, a U.S. labor judge ruled on Friday. The company committed a series of violations of the National Labor Relations Act in 2017 and 2018, Amita Baman Tracy, a California administrative law judge ruled in a court filing.

'System is not broken' after 737 MAX crashes: review panel chair

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration process for certifying new airplanes is not broken but needs to be improved, the chair of an international panel of air-safety regulators, tasked to review Boeing Co's 737 Max, said on Friday. Speaking on the sidelines of an event at a New York City college, Christopher Hart, chair of the multi-agency panel, said there was no need to question the agency's overall way of certifying airplanes.

Democrats appeal for more witnesses to come forward about Trump-Ukraine matter

Democrats are urging people who might have more information about President Donald Trump's effort to persuade Ukraine to investigate political rival Joe Biden to come forward as Trump struggles to contain the fallout from the scandal. A whistleblower report, released on Thursday, said Trump not only abused his office in attempting to solicit Ukraine's interference in the 2020 U.S. election for his political benefit, but that the White House tried to "lock down" evidence about that conduct.

Legal setback for Trump administration plan to speed some deportations

A federal judge ordered the Department of Homeland Security to set aside a plan that would make more people vulnerable to expedited deportation until a court can rule on the matter. The lawsuit, filed by WeCount! and other immigration advocates, asked a Washington court to overturn a plan making undocumented people eligible for deportation without court oversight unless they could prove they had been in the country more than two years.

U.S. agents raid genetic testing labs, charge 35 in Medicare fraud probe

U.S. federal agents raided genetic testing laboratories, and 35 people were criminally charged in four states in a crackdown on genetic testing fraud that officials said on Friday caused $2.1 billion in losses to federal healthcare insurance programs. Officials at the Justice Department and Health and Human Services Department Office of the Inspector General said charges were filed in Florida, Texas, Louisiana and Georgia in "one of the largest healthcare fraud schemes ever charged."