Reuters World News Summary

Following is a summary of current world news briefs.

Exclusive: China-owned oil tanker changes name in apparent effort to evade U.S. sanctions

While in the Indian Ocean heading toward the Strait of Malacca, the very large crude carrier (VLCC) Pacific Bravo went dark on June 5, shutting off the transponder that signals its position and direction to other ships, ship-tracking data showed. A U.S. government official had warned ports in Asia not to allow the ship to dock, saying it was carrying Iranian crude in violation of U.S. economic sanctions. A VLCC typically transports about 2 million barrels of oil, worth about $120 million at current prices.

Driver shot dead after ramming car into Israeli civilians in West Bank

Israeli police shot dead a Palestinian driver they said had carried out a car-ramming attack on Friday that injured two Israeli civilians in the occupied West Bank, one of them critically. Reuters journalists at the scene saw police rolling the body of the driver into a plastic sheet. Palestinian health authorities identified him as a Palestinian national.

Greenland tells Trump it is open for business but not for sale

Greenland on Friday dismissed the notion that it might be up for sale after reports that U.S. President Donald Trump had privately discussed with his advisers the idea of buying the world's biggest island. "We are open for business, but we're not for sale," Greenland's foreign minister Ane Lone Bagger told Reuters.

Israel to allow U.S. Rep Tlaib to visit family in West Bank

Israel will allow U.S. lawmaker Rashida Tlaib to visit her family in the occupied West Bank on humanitarian grounds, the interior ministry said on Friday, after barring an official visit under pressure from U.S. President Donald Trump. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Thursday he would not allow Tlaib and congresswoman Ilhan Omar, both Democrats, to make a planned trip to Israel.

Iran tanker could leave Gibraltar on Friday unless U.S. legal bid succeeds

An Iranian tanker caught in the standoff between Tehran and the West could sail free from British territory Gibraltar on Friday, unless a last-ditch push by the United States succeeds in dragging the saga back into court. The Grace 1 was seized by British Royal Marine commandos in darkness at the western mouth of the Mediterranean on July 4 on suspicion of violating European Union sanctions by taking oil to Syria, a close ally of Iran.

Cathay CEO resigns amid Hong Kong protest blowback as more rallies planned

The boss of Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific Airways quit on Friday, the highest-profile corporate casualty of unrest roiling the former British colony, after Beijing targeted the airline over staff involvement in mass protests. The corporate upheaval comes ahead of a weekend where further protests are planned, including what could be a large gathering on Sunday that could test whether a movement that has enjoyed broad support can retain it, even as violence escalates.

German finance minister Scholz to run for SPD leadership

German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz will run for the leadership of the Social Democrats, a spokeswoman said on Friday, joining a race to revive the party's popularity sinking since it entered a coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives. A successful bid by Scholz to lead the Social Democrats (SPD) would bring more stability to Merkel's shaky right-left coalition, which the SPD entered reluctantly last year after a 2017 election.

North Korea fires missiles, derides South Korea's Moon as 'impudent'

North Korea launched at least two short-range ballistic missiles on Friday, South Korea's military said, shortly after Pyongyang described South Korea's president as "impudent" and vowed that inter-Korean talks are over. The North has protested against joint U.S.-South Korea military drills, largely computer-simulated, which kicked off last week, calling them a rehearsal for war. It has also fired several short-range missiles in recent weeks.

Schools, telephone lines to be opened in Kashmir after lockdown

Authorities will begin restoring some telephone lines in Indian Kashmir from Friday night, including in the main city of Srinagar where afternoon prayers went peacefully amid heavy security, the top state official said. Telephone and internet links were cut and public assembly banned in Kashmir just before New Delhi removed the decades-old autonomy the Muslim majority territory enjoyed under the Indian constitution. The measures were aimed at preventing protests.

Poland may join U.S.-led mission in Strait of Hormuz

Poland is considering supporting a U.S.-led mission to protect the Strait of Hormuz, but has not made a formal decision yet. "From our point of view actions to stabilize this region would be justified," a spokeswoman at Poland's foreign ministry told Reuters in a statement.