Reuters World News Summary

Following is a summary of current world news briefs.

Nigerian court grants permission to declare Shi'ite group terrorists

A Nigerian court has granted the government permission to label a local Shi'ite Muslim group a terrorist organisation, the solicitor general told Reuters on Saturday. Members of the Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN) have been marching in the capital Abuja calling for the release of their leader, Ibrahim Zakzaky, who has been in detention since 2015 despite a court order to release him.

Russia's Lavrov says Venezuela dialogue should have 'no preconditions'

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Saturday a dialogue to resolve Venezuela's political crisis should have "no preconditions," as he visited the small South American country of Suriname at the end of a multi-nation Latin American tour. Venezuela's bitterly divided government and opposition are engaged in a dialogue mediated by Norway's government. The opposition, led by National Assembly president Juan Guaido, has insisted President Nicolas Maduro step down to allow a transition government to call fresh elections.

Sudan says 87 killed when troops broke up protest, critics say too low

The head of an official Sudanese investigation said on Saturday 87 people were killed when security forces broke up a protest on June 3, a figure that prompted demonstrations across the capital as opponents of Sudan's military rulers dismissed it as far too low. Fath al-Rahman Saeed, the head of the investigative committee appointed by the public prosecutor, said members of the security forces fired live ammunition at protesters in Khartoum who were demanding the military cede power.

Police fire tear gas, rubber bullets in Hong Kong clash over anti-triad march

Police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at demonstrators hurling rocks in a rural Hong Kong town on Saturday as several thousand activists gathered to protest an attack by suspected triad gang members at a train station last weekend. Activists held the march in Yuen Long, scene of the attack by club-wielding men, despite a police ban on safety grounds.

Syria's Rukban camp dwindles after five-month Russian siege: residents, aid workers

The population of Rukban camp in a U.S.-protected desert zone in southeast Syria has dwindled to a quarter of the more than 40,000 who lived there five months ago due to Russian moves to block supplies, Syrian aid workers, diplomats and residents say. The fate of the camp and its residents, living near a Pentagon-run base close to the Jordanian and Iraqi borders, highlights the tussle for influence in the region between Russia and the United States.

Firefighters, army battle wildfires threatening homes at Croatia coast

Firefighters and Croatian army forces on Saturday joined a battle against wildfires threatening homes and wind power plants near the coastal Adriatic town of Sibenik, state news agency Hina reported. About 200 firefighters and 50 soldiers were deployed in the area south of Sibenik in the evening as the wind picked up strength and after firefighting aircraft that were deployed during the day had to withdraw for the night.

Guatemalan presidential candidates question U.S. migration deal

The two contenders to be Guatemala's next president questioned on Saturday the validity of a deal struck by the country's government with the United States that aims to curb the flow of migrants north from Central America. U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday said he would drop the threat of economic sanctions against Guatemala after its government agreed to implement new measures aimed at bringing down U.S. asylum claims from migrants fleeing Honduras and El Salvador.

Russia detains more than 1,000 people in opposition crackdown

Russian police rounded up more than 1,000 people in Moscow on Saturday in one of the biggest crackdowns of recent times against an increasingly defiant opposition decrying President Vladimir Putin's tight grip on power. The detentions came around a protest to demand that opposition members be allowed to run in a local election. Authorities had declared it illegal and sought to block participation, but several thousand people turned up anyway in one of the longest and most determined protests of recent years.

'Boris bounce': UK Conservatives surge in opinion poll

Britain's Conservative Party has opened up a 10-point lead over the opposition Labour Party since Boris Johnson took over as prime minister, an opinion poll showed. The Sunday Times newspaper said the "Boris bounce" had pushed support for Johnson's Conservatives to 31%, up six percentage points from the previous poll, while Labour was on 21%, up two points.

U.S. Marines 'likely' to enter Venezuela, says socialist party No. 2

Venezuelan Socialist Party Vice President Diosdado Cabello on Saturday predicted U.S. Marines will "likely" enter the South American country, speaking a week after a confrontation between aircraft belonging to the two countries' armed forces. "We are few, a small country, we are very humble, and here it is likely that the U.S. Marines enter. It is likely that they enter," Cabello told the Sao Paulo Forum, a gathering of leftist politicians and activists from across Latin America, without citing evidence.