Royal Bank of Canada confirms employee has contracted coronavirus

By Nichola Saminather

By Nichola Saminather

TORONTO, March 9 (Reuters) - A Royal Bank of Canada employee working at one of the lender's suburban Toronto offices, who was earlier suspected of having contracted coronavirus, has tested positive, a spokeswoman told Reuters on Monday.

The person worked in the Meadowvale office complex in Mississauga, some 40 kilometers (25 miles) west of the bank's downtown Toronto headquarters. The person has remained at home in self-isolation since late last week, she said.

Last week, Royal Bank advised other employees working on the same floor to self-quarantine until further notice, she said.

The bank has also disinfected the affected floor, and all common areas, including elevators, the cafeteria and wash rooms, she said.

"We continue to work with Public Health in determining advice and next steps for our employees on the impacted floor," she said.

More than 111,600 people have been infected by the coronavirus across the world and over 3,800 have died, according to a Reuters tally of government announcements. (Reporting by Nichola Saminather; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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