• A group of D.C. protesters now has a list of demands
    Yahoo News

    A group of D.C. protesters now has a list of demands

    As protests continue to erupt around the country, a group of three young African-American activists is attempting to link the demonstrations to a list of demands. The group, Concerned Citizens, has emerged from the nation's capital, a hotbed of the protests that began following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after he was taken into police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. The group's three leading organizers, Aalayah Eastmond, 19, Seun Babalola, 22, and Ty Hobson-Powell, 24, plan to unveil their demands, which they shared exclusively with Yahoo News, at a protest in Washington on Wednesday afternoon.

  • Live: Obama hosts 'reimagining policing' town hall in wake of George Floyd's death
    Yahoo News

    Live: Obama hosts 'reimagining policing' town hall in wake of George Floyd's death

    Former President Barack Obama on Wednesday will host a virtual town hall to address the recent killings of unarmed black Americans, including George Floyd, and the days of protests that have followed. Former Attorney General Eric Holder is among the guest panelists expected to appear. “The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and the loss of far too many Black lives to list, have left our nation anguished and outraged,” reads a message about the town hall on the Obama Foundation's website.

  • Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers
    INSIDER

    Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers

    The Minneapolis Police Department Chief filed a civil suit against the department alleging discrimination against people of color including black officers in 2007, CNN reported. Excessive force complaints against Minneapolis officers were common, specifically from African-American residents, The New York Times reported. Derek Chauvin, the ex-police officer charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter tied to George Floyd's death had 18 complaints against him prior to the incident.

  • The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies
    Business Insider

    The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies

    REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst A technology advocacy group filed the first lawsuit challenging President Trump's recent executive order targeting social-media companies. The lawsuit on Tuesday, filed by the Center for Democracy in Technology, argues that the order violates the First Amendment. Trump issued the executive order, which seeks to change a law protecting social-media companies, after Twitter flagged his tweets with a fact-check label.

  • Cuomo lashes out at New York mayor and police after night of violence sees Macy's looted
    The Independent

    Cuomo lashes out at New York mayor and police after night of violence sees Macy's looted

    Manhattan's flagship Macy's store was among dozens of businesses hit by looters on Monday evening, as a nighttime curfew in New York failed to prevent widespread looting in the city. While peaceful protests and marches over the police killing of George Floyd were taking place across the city, roving groups caused chaos in Midtown, smashing their way into shops and stealing merchandise. The looting began around 8pm, lasting into the night and beyond the 11pm curfew.

  • Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing
    Reuters

    Amsterdam anti-racism rally criticised for lack of social distancing

    Amsterdam's mayor faced criticism from politicians and health experts on Tuesday after thousands of demonstrators packed the city centre for an anti-racism rally in violation of social distancing rules put in place to ward off the coronavirus. The protesters rallied in support of George Floyd, a black American who died in police custody in the United States last week, their number swelling from an expected 200-300 to several thousands on Monday. Amsterdam Mayor Femke Halsema, of the Green Left party, said city authorities were caught off guard by the huge turnout and could not have intervened peacefully.

  • Hong Kong to lead Tiananmen mourning despite virus vigil ban
    AFP

    Hong Kong to lead Tiananmen mourning despite virus vigil ban

    Hong Kong will Thursday lead global remembrance of China's deadly Tiananmen crackdown, with people lighting candles in neighbourhoods across the restless city after authorities banned a mass vigil because of the coronavirus. Open discussion of the brutal suppression is forbidden inside China, where hundreds -- by some estimates more than a thousand -- died when the Communist Party sent tanks on June 4, 1989 to crush a student-led demonstration in Beijing calling for democratic reforms. But Hong Kongers have kept memories alive for the last three decades by holding a huge annual vigil in a park, the only place inside China were such mass displays of remembrance are possible.

  • Associated Press

    FAA chief called before Senate to testify about Boeing plane

    The nation's top aviation regulator is going back to Capitol Hill to explain the government's oversight of the Boeing 737 Max, which remains grounded after two deadly crashes. The Senate Commerce Committee said Tuesday that Federal Aviation Administration chief Stephen Dickson will appear before the panel June 17. Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Ala., introduced legislation Tuesday that would direct the FAA to reconsider assumptions it makes about how quickly pilots respond to warning signs.

  • Italy welcomes tourists (but the feeling’s not mutual)
    Politico

    Italy welcomes tourists (but the feeling’s not mutual)

    Italy's having a party and everyone's invited. Aiming to make up ground after the late start to the summer season, Italy opens its borders to all European Union tourists from Wednesday. A patchwork of agreements for the reinstatement of post-pandemic cross-border travel this summer is undermining the EU's attempts to create an atmosphere of unity and solidarity, and even casting doubt on the future of freedom of movement within the Schengen area.

  • Joe Biden pulls Julián Castro into campaign, asks for help to 'tackle police reform'
    NBC News

    Joe Biden pulls Julián Castro into campaign, asks for help to 'tackle police reform'

    Former Vice President Joe Biden followed a speech addressing the national protests over the death of George Floyd on Tuesday with a welcoming of Julián Castro to his campaign to help tackle police reform, an issue that was a cornerstone of Castro's failed presidential campaign. The welcome mat for Castro, who was the only major Latino candidate in the Democratic presidential nomination race, comes almost two months after Castro first expressed support for Biden and amid a national uprising in peaceful and violent protests following Floyd's death after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly eight minutes. In his speech, Biden called for Congress to take immediate steps to reform police, including outlawing choke holds, ending the transfer of military weapons to police, improving oversight and accountability of police and creating a national model on use of force.

  • America could move weapons stored on British soil if UK persists with Huawei, US senator warns
    The Telegraph

    America could move weapons stored on British soil if UK persists with Huawei, US senator warns

    America could move weapons stored on British soil if the UK allows Huawei to build its 5G network, a US senator has warned. Tom Cotton, the Republican senator for Arkansas who was called as a witness before the Defence Select Committee, warned that the case for America keeping some US Air Force assets, such as F-35 fighters, in the UK could be weakened if it goes ahead with Huawei, as it would pose a security risk. We have to make a decision about deploying those [F-35 fighters] to many countries,” Senator Cotton said.

  • 'My face exploded': Police firing rubber bullets have wounded and permanently disabled protesters and journalists
    INSIDER

    'My face exploded': Police firing rubber bullets have wounded and permanently disabled protesters and journalists

    Social media is filled with images of wounded protesters and journalists who have been struck by rubber bullets and tear gas canisters in the eyes and face. Some have even lost their sight. Experts policing, however, tell Insider that rubber bullets are considered "less lethal" weapons — and many police departments have considered them a "legitimate tool" for decades.

  • Police Identify German Man as Main Suspect in Madeleine McCann Disappearance
    The Daily Beast

    Police Identify German Man as Main Suspect in Madeleine McCann Disappearance

    Police in the U.K. have asked the public for help in tracking the movements of a 43-year-old German man identified as the main suspect in the mysterious disappearance of Madeleine McCann. Madeleine vanished from a hotel apartment in Praia da Luz on Portugal's Algarve coast in May 2007, while on holiday with her parents and twin siblings. It is the first time British police have identified a key suspect, and senior police officers described the breakthrough to the U.K.'s Telegraph as “significant.”

  • An 'ANTIFA' Twitter account that called for looting 'white hoods' was actually run by white nationalist group Identity Evropa
    Business Insider

    An 'ANTIFA' Twitter account that called for looting 'white hoods' was actually run by white nationalist group Identity Evropa

    A fake antifa Twitter account that called for violence was actually run by a white nationalist group, according to a Twitter spokesperson. The account, "@ANTIFA_US," pretended to align with the Black Lives Matter movement and ongoing nationwide protests, and called for protesters to "move into residential areas... the white hoods.... and we take what's ours." Twitter banned the account Monday for breaking its rules against platform manipulation, spam, and inciting violence.

  • ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC
    The Independent

    ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC

    US riot police were broadcast live on air using aggressive force to push and knock down an Australian reporter and her cameraman as they covered the Black Lives Matter protests in Washington DC, prompting an investigation by the Australian embassy. Amelia Brace, a reporter for Australian television network Channel 7, was broadcasting from the White House with cameraman Timothy Myers when police plouged into the crowd with riot shields, firing rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them. Footage of the police barrelling at the camera and shoving the news team was viewed over a million times in a matter of hours.

  • Greek demonstrators hurl firebombs towards U.S. embassy in Athens
    Reuters

    Greek demonstrators hurl firebombs towards U.S. embassy in Athens

    Demonstrators hurled firebombs in a march towards the U.S. Embassy compound in Athens on Wednesday in a protest over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Reuters journalists saw demonstrators throwing several flaming objects which erupted into flames on the street towards the heavily-guarded embassy in central Athens and police responding with rounds of teargas. Demonstrators were holding banners and placards reading "Black lives matter" and "I can't breathe".

  • D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'
    Yahoo News Video

    D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'

    Hours into the mandatory curfew in Washington, D.C., several police officers were recorded engaging in peaceful dialogue with protesters. While remaining in opposition to the extended protests over George Floyd's death, one officer appeared to commiserate with protesters' desire to seek change.

  • Gov. Cuomo apologizes to NYPD brass after critical 'do your job' comments, chief says
    USA TODAY

    Gov. Cuomo apologizes to NYPD brass after critical 'do your job' comments, chief says

    ALBANY, N.Y. – New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo apologized privately to top New York City Police administrators Tuesday after earlier in the day ripping their response to rioters as a "disgrace." NYPD Chief Terence Monahan told NBC's "Today" show Wednesday that Cuomo's office called him, and the governor called commissioner Dermot Shea to apologize and clarify his remarks. Last night, his office called and apologized to me, and I know he called the commissioner directly to apologize,” Monahan said.

  • West Virginia governor says he welcomes all, except Obama
    Associated Press

    West Virginia governor says he welcomes all, except Obama

    West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice on Wednesday said he would welcome any president to the state besides former President Barack Obama. The unprompted comment came during a coronavirus news conference in which the Republican governor took a phone call from President Donald Trump and sought to highlight his relationship with the commander-in-chief ahead of the coming primary election. “We should absolutely welcome all but, you know, maybe not Barack Obama,” he said, smiling.

  • Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'
    NBC News

    Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'

    Rep. Eliot Engel, a New York Democrat facing a tough primary challenge and questions about his absence from his district, was caught on a hot mic at a district event responding to unrest saying twice that he only wanted press coverage because of an electoral threat. “If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care,” Engel said to Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, at a Tuesday press conference responding to unrest and vandalism in his district related to the recent death of George Floyd. Diaz worried about having too many elected officials speak, but Engel pleaded with him for coverage.

  • Voices captured on an NYC police scanner can be heard saying protesters should be shot and run over
    INSIDER

    Voices captured on an NYC police scanner can be heard saying protesters should be shot and run over

    REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz A New York police scanner broadcast voices advocating violence against protesters. Audio clips of the communication have circulated on social media. In one clip, someone says: "Shoot those motherf---ers," referring to the protesters.

  • 2 dead after shooting at North Dakota air base
    Yahoo News Video

    2 dead after shooting at North Dakota air base

    A shooting on Monday left two airmen dead at the Grand Forks Air Force Base in North Dakota, the military said. The base's emergency services members responded to the shooting, which occurred at 4:30 a.m. Officials said there is no risk to other personnel, and the shooting remains under investigation.

  • The architect of Sweden's no-lockdown plan suggested the strategy was a mistake based on what we now know about the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    The architect of Sweden's no-lockdown plan suggested the strategy was a mistake based on what we now know about the coronavirus

    JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP via Getty Images The scientist behind Sweden's no-lockdown coronavirus strategy has suggested for the first time that the approach may have been a mistake. Anders Tegnell told Swedish radio if the country had more knowledge about the coronavirus earlier in its outbreak, its reponse would likely have been "somewhere in between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world has done." Sweden has repeatedly defended its plan while saying it was constantly monitoring to see if it needed to change its strategy.

  • Missing Mexican congresswoman's body found a month after abduction
    The Guardian

    Missing Mexican congresswoman's body found a month after abduction

    The body of a missing Mexican congresswoman has been found in a shallow grave more than a month after she was abducted by armed men while raising awareness about the coronavirus pandemic. Anel Bueno, a 38-year-old lawmaker from the western state of Colima, was snatched on 29 April in Ixtlahuacán, a town on a stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast that the drug trade has made one of the country's most murderous regions. Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador told reporters on Wednesday a suspect had been detained over the killing of Bueno, who was a member of his party, Morena.

  • Germany wants to swap EU travel warning for softer guidelines this week
    Reuters

    Germany wants to swap EU travel warning for softer guidelines this week

    Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said that the German cabinet would on Wednesday discuss a resolution on downgrading the travel warnings currently in force for European Union countries and several other associated countries into softer guidelines. "We are preparing a resolution for the cabinet tomorrow, which is still being agreed within the government," Maas told reporters at a news conference with his Ukrainian counterpart on Tuesday. "This week we want to start by turning the travel warning we have for the European Union and the associated countries into travel guidelines," he added.