Rudy Giuliani claims he's 'the real whistleblower' and that no one will know the real story on Trump and Ukraine 'if I get killed'

Grace Panetta

Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

  • President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani is caught in the middle of an explosive whistleblower complaint from an intelligence official alleging that Trump improperly pressured Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

  • The complaint has spurred an official impeachment inquiry into Trump and could lead to legal consequences for Giuliani, a former US attorney and mayor of New York City.

  • But Giuliani told Politico he believes he's "the real whistleblower" and said, "If I get killed now, you won't get the rest of the story."

  • While Giuliani told Politico that he deserved whistleblower protection, his attempts to defend himself have only further incriminated him in the whole saga.

  • Unlike Trump, Giuliani is a private citizen and could be vulnerable to prosecution, especially as he's confirmed much of the substance of the whistleblower's complaint.

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President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani is caught in the middle of an explosive whistleblower complaint from an intelligence official alleging that Trump, with Giuliani's help, was "using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election."

The complaint has spurred an official impeachment inquiry into Trump and could lead to legal consequences for Giuliani, a former US attorney and mayor of New York City.

But Giuliani told Politico on Friday that he believes he's "the real whistleblower" and said, "If I get killed now, you won't get the rest of the story."

The whistleblower complaint said — and Giuliani has acknowledged — that Trump and State Department officials enlisted Giuliani to work with the Ukrainian government to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden, who sat on the board of the Ukrainian oil and gas company Burisma Holdings, on allegations of corruption.

Read more: There's a glaring loophole in Trump and Giuliani's allegations of corruption against Joe Biden

Rudy Giuliani

Giuliani and Trump have alleged, without evidence, that as vice president, Biden tried to help his son by calling for the firing of a prosecutor investigating Burisma, Viktor Shokin.

But The Wall Street Journal and other outlets have reported that Shokin was accused of being soft on corruption and hampering investigations, including the one into Burisma — that in essence, Biden, and much of the international community, urged Shokin's ouster because he was ineffective.

While Giuliani told Politico that he deserved whistleblower protection based on the corruption allegations he'd levied against the Bidens, his attempts to defend himself have only further incriminated him in the whole saga.

In the past week, Giuliani has:

Giuliani was referred to in the whistleblower's complaint as a "central figure" in the administration's efforts to encourage Ukraine to investigate the Bidens, which included serving as an "envoy" on the matter and meeting with an aide to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Andriy Yermak, who is named in a text message Giuliani tweeted.

Read more: 'Lawyer up': DOJ veterans have one piece of advice for Trump and Giuliani amid the Ukraine whistleblower scandal

Department of Justice policy dictates that Trump's position as a sitting US president makes him immune from prosecution.

But Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor, said in an NBC op-ed article that because Giuliani is a private citizen he could be vulnerable to prosecution, especially as he has confirmed much of the substance of the whistleblower's complaint.

Rocah and other former prosecutors interviewed by Insider argued that Giuliani's collaboration with the Trump administration in pressuring Ukraine to investigate the Bidens could violate the Logan Act, the Hobbs Act, or federal campaign-finance laws, and could even rise to the level of a bribery scheme if Trump were found to have leveraged military aid in exchange for investigations.

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