Rudy Giuliani's personal communications director is a 20-year-old minor Instagram personality still getting her communications degree

acollman@businessinsider.com (Ashley Collman)
Rudy Giuliani

Charles Krupa, File/AP Photo

  • On Tuesday, Politico published a report detailing the background of Rudy Giuliani's new director of communications, Christianné Allen.
  • The reporters Daniel Lippman and Tina Nguyen found that Allen, 20, is still getting a communications degree online and had inflated much of her résumé.
  • Giuliani has stuck by Allen even as his actions in Ukraine helped trigger articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump and as he's reportedly under investigation by federal prosecutors.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Rudy Giuliani's new representative is a 20-year-old college student who appears to have made up large chunks of her résumé, according to a Politico report published Tuesday.

Christianné Allen became Giuliani's director of communications in September. And while the president's personal attorney has stood by the hire, others in Trumpworld told Politico that Allen had a pattern of lying and had embellished her experience.

Allen's entry into Giuliani's world comes at a perilous time for the former New York City mayor. His activities in Ukraine — trying to dig up dirt on Joe and Hunter Biden, pressuring Ukraine's government to announce an investigation into the Bidens before the 2020 election, and pursuing his own business interests — have helped trigger articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. He is also reportedly the subject of an investigation by federal prosecutors in Manhattan that could result in criminal charges.

And at this moment in Giuliani's long career, he is being represented in the press by a 20-year-old who seems to have severely misrepresented her experience.

Allen overstated her work experience

The fabrications appear to date back to when Allen started working for the Trump campaign in 2015, dropping out of high school to do so.

A former Trump Virginia campaign official told Politico that she got a position on the campaign because "she went around telling everybody" that she was the niece of George Allen, the former Virginia governor and senator.

"I would introduce her to other people as George Allen's niece, and then I guess she got in front of someone who was actually related to George Allen and she corrected herself then," the former campaign official said.

Allen told Politico that she never claimed to be related to the Virginia statesman.

"There were a few officials on the campaign who thought we were related based on our last name," she said. "I was asked one time in a public setting if I was related to him and I laughed and said no."

Much of Allen's résumé also seems to be overstated. Here are a few other inconsistencies that the Politico reporters Daniel Lippman and Tina Nguyen found when digging into the positions she listed in her work history:

  • Representative for the Trump Victory Finance Committee: A person familiar with the matter said that anyone could sign up online to be a volunteer fundraiser. Allen said she had raised almost $30,000, which isn't enough to be considered a "member."
  • Video columnist for the Daily Caller: She recorded only two videos for the website. Both were unpaid.
  • Spokeswoman for Trump's 2016 presidential campaign: Trump campaign officials said she was not a spokeswoman. Allen told Politico she said that "only because I spoke at a couple rallies."
  • Executive director of the Middle Eastern Women's Coalition: The coalition was launched earlier this year by Rabia Kazan. But the chairman of the group, Arwa Sawan, said that it never really got off the ground and that there were "no activities for that organization."

A former Trump official said Allen was constantly attaching herself to multiple groups.

"I forget all the titles she told me she had. She was 'millennials for something' or 'teens for this,'" the former official said, adding: "I think she made it to a point where she made [volunteering] untenable. She wasn't productive, but she was attempting to insert herself into everything. If there's an event, she's showing up to help whether or not she was invited."

After dropping out of high school to work on the Trump campaign, Allen took courses online through Liberty University to get her diploma and take college courses. She's still taking online courses to complete an undergraduate degree in communications.

Not counting an internship with a Long Island lawyer, Allen doesn't seem to have much of a work history. Her position in conservative political groups seems to have been mostly social until recently.

Her Instagram account, which has nearly 18,000 followers, shows her at Fox News' headquarters, hobnobbing at the Trump International Hotel in DC, and taking photos with political figures.

Giuliani's friends aren't confident she's the right person for the job

Politico reported that Allen appeared to have started getting close to Giuliani in July, citing videos showing them hanging out on a boat and dining at a New York restaurant.

Allen told Politico she was introduced to Giuliani by a woman but did not go into more detail. Neither her father nor Giuliani's friends know how the two met.

"Nobody can figure out who the eff she is or how she got in there," one of Giuliani's friends told Politico.

Allen said she began interviewing for the job in September and went through several rounds of interviews.

She said Giuliani expressed "that I had the necessary skills and leadership to fill the position."

When Politico asked Giuliani about Allen's hire, he defended the decision.

Allen "has already established a very strong and exceptional record as a very talented strategist, spokesperson, technology consultant and person of very mature judgment," he said. "She just finished a very grueling assignment in three different countries in four days. This assignment was accomplished flawlessly and is well beyond the abilities of your anonymous and otherwise unquestionably jealous sources."

Read the full story at Politico »

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