Russia told residents living near the site of last week's failed missile test to evacuate but then mysteriously canceled the order

Ryan Pickrell
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the Navy Day parade in Saint Petersburg, Russia July 28, 2019. Sputnik/Aleksey Nikolskyi/Kremlin via REUTERS

Reuters


  • Russia told the residents of Nyonoksa, a town near the military test site where a failed weapons test last week resulted in a deadly explosion, to evacuate Tuesday, but then the order was mysteriously canceled.
  • The weapon tested last week is believed to have been the 9M730 Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, a kind of doomsday missile that NATO refers to as SSC-X-9 Skyfall.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin has bragged about the missile's capabilities, despite the fact that it doesn't actually work.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Russia ordered the evacuation of residents living near the military testing range where a suspected test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile ended in a deadly explosion last week but then mysteriously canceled the order, the Associated Press reports, citing Russian media.

Residents of Nyonoksa were initially instructed to relocate due to unspecified military activities. The residents were, CNN reports, to be evacuated by train.

Five Russian nuclear scientists were buried Monday after they were killed in an explosion last week that also temporarily resulted in a spike in radiation levels nearby. Western intelligence officials and experts believe that they were working on the 9M730 Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, a kind of doomsday missile that NATO refers to as SSC-X-9 Skyfall.

Read more: The blast that killed 5 Russian engineers was apparently caused by another failed test of Putin's doomsday missile

Tweeting Monday afternoon, President Donald Trump referred to what he called the "failed missile explosion in Russia" as the "'Skyfall' explosion," confirming that the US believes that this was the state-of-the-art missile that  Russian President Vladimir Putin has boasted about — despite the fact that it doesn't work.

Russia has declined to say whether or not the failed test last week involved the Burevestnik.

Putin bragged in March 2018 that the then-unnamed missile was "invincible," proudly asserting that the weapon has "an unlimited range, unpredictable trajectory and ability to bypass interception." So far, the weapon has posed a greater threat to the Russian people than any potential adversary.

Alexei Likhachev, the head of Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation, Russia's state nuclear agency, said Monday that the best way to honor the memory of the those who died is "further work on the new weapons." It is currently unclear if the evacuation ordered Tuesday was related to plans for additional testing.

Commenting on last week's explosion, the Kremlin said Tuesday that "accidents, unfortunately, happen."

The Russian military regularly suffers serious accidents. Just last week, there was the failed missile tests, and then an ammunition depot at another base exploded twice.

Jeffrey Edmonds, a former CIA analyst and member of the National Security Council, recently told INSIDER that the problem appears to be that Russia often combines a willingness to take risks with an outdated military infrastructure that simply can't support that culture, creating an environment where accidents are more likely.

Read more: Here's why the Russian military has so many serious accidents

NOW WATCH: Heart-pounding video shows a badass Coast Guardsman running down a narco-sub loaded with cocaine and pounding on the hatch

  • In fiery memo, Dem lawmaker urges Congress to include Trump’s 'racism' in articles of impeachment
    Yahoo News

    In fiery memo, Dem lawmaker urges Congress to include Trump’s 'racism' in articles of impeachment

    The first member of Congress who called for President Trump to be impeached sent a memo Wednesday to House members urging them to incorporate concerns about Trump's “racism” into the ongoing impeachment inquiry. In the memo, Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, noted that, in July, the House passed a resolution condemning Trump for making “racist comments” about four Democratic congresswomen of color. “How will history judge this Congress that passed a resolution indicating President Trump made harmful, racist comments if it does not impeach him for his impeachable racist, anti-Semitic, Islamophobic, transphobic, xenophobic language instigating enmity and inciting violence within our society?” Green asked in his memo, which was obtained by Yahoo News.

  • Democrats face prospect of no black candidates on December debate stage
    Yahoo News

    Democrats face prospect of no black candidates on December debate stage

    The most diverse Democratic candidate field will likely be represented by no black candidates in the next televised debate. California Sen. Kamala Harris's abrupt exit Tuesday afternoon rendered the field without a black woman — and New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, although sailing off a campaign fundraising high post-November debate, has yet to hit the DNC's polling threshold of at least 4 percent in four qualifying national polls or 6 percent in two early state polls. Real Clear Politics national polling averages show Booker making the board at just 2 percent — consistent with his polling in consequential early states like Iowa and New Hampshire.

  • Pearl Harbour shooting: two people killed after US sailor attacks base in Hawaii
    The Telegraph

    Pearl Harbour shooting: two people killed after US sailor attacks base in Hawaii

    Two people have been killed and one injured after a gunman opened fire before taking his own life at Pearl Harbour military base in Hawaii. The Pearl Harbour Naval Shipyard was locked down on Wednesday afternoon after the shooting which is believed to have started at 2.30pm local time (10.30pm GMT). The shooting took place at Dry Dock 2, near the south entrance of a combined US Air Force and Navy base about 8 miles (13 km) from Honolulu.

  • Wanted Indian guru resurfaces to announce new cosmic country
    AFP

    Wanted Indian guru resurfaces to announce new cosmic country

    An Indian guru facing rape and sexual abuse charges made headlines Wednesday after he emerged from hiding and announced the birth of a new cosmic country with its own cabinet and golden passports. Swami Nithyananda, a controversial self-styled godman with thousands of followers in southern India's Karnataka and Tamil Nadu states, posted a video on his YouTube channel announcing the special project to his followers. 41-year-old Nithyananda announced that his country is called Kailaasa, and is the biggest Hindu nation without boundaries.

  • Activists apologize for use of Holocaust victims’ remains
    Associated Press

    Activists apologize for use of Holocaust victims’ remains

    An activist group has apologized to Jewish organizations outraged over their use of purported Holocaust victims' remains in an installation outside Germany's parliament building meant to draw attention to the perils of far-right extremism. The Center for Political Beauty, a Germany-based activist group known for provocative stunts, installed an urn outside the Reichtstag building on Monday, saying it contained victims' remains that it had unearthed from 23 locations near Nazi death and concentration camps in Germany, Poland and Ukraine. “We want to apologize especially to Jewish institutions, associations and individuals who see our work as disturbing or touching the peace of the dead according to Jewish religious law,” the group said on its website in a post late Wednesday.

  • Harvard grad student workers go on strike, seeking $25 an hour minimum wage, other demands
    USA TODAY

    Harvard grad student workers go on strike, seeking $25 an hour minimum wage, other demands

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. —  Slogging through snow showers and slush, hundreds of Harvard University graduate student workers picketed Tuesday at Harvard Yard, as thousands went on strike seeking higher pay and other demands. It marked the first strike of graduate students on the Ivy League campus since 1973, when teaching fellows and  protested the university's financial aid program. The strike threatened some of the university's educational operations before final exams.

  • Navy warship seizes suspected Iran missile parts set for Yemen
    Yahoo News Video

    Navy warship seizes suspected Iran missile parts set for Yemen

    A Navy warship has seized a “significant cache” of suspected Iranian guided missile parts headed to rebels in Yemen, U.S. officials said Wednesday, marking the first time that such sophisticated components have been taken en route to the war there.

  • The U.S. Army's Ultimate Weapon Isn't a New Gun or Tank
    The National Interest

    The U.S. Army's Ultimate Weapon Isn't a New Gun or Tank

    What if AI-enabled computer programs were able to instantly discern specifics regarding the threat such as location, weapons and affiliation by performing real-time analytics on drone feeds and other fast-moving sources of information, instantly sending crucial data to soldiers in combat? Operating in a matter of milliseconds, AI-empowered computer algorithms could bounce new information off vast databases of previously compiled data to make these distinctions--instantly informing soldiers caught in the crossfire. Much of this work centered upon near and far-term applications of AI is being done by the ARL's Cognition and Neuroergonomics Collaborative Technology Alliance.

  • The college admissions scandal ringleader tried to recruit 7 Stanford coaches to be part of the scheme but only one took the bait
    INSIDER

    The college admissions scandal ringleader tried to recruit 7 Stanford coaches to be part of the scheme but only one took the bait

    Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne said in a letter to the university community that the ringleader of the college admissions scandal, William "Rick" Singer, approached seven coaches at the school about trading bribes for students' recruitments to the school at athletes. Tessier-Lavigne said an external review of the case revealed that only the school's former sailing coach, John Vandemoer, accepted Singer's deal. Vandemoer accepted $610,000 in bribes from Singer to facilitate the admission of students as sailing recruits.

  • Trump impeachment hearings: 4 takeaways from Day 6 of public testimony
    Yahoo News

    Trump impeachment hearings: 4 takeaways from Day 6 of public testimony

    The impeachment inquiry into President Trump resumed following the Thanksgiving recess and moved venues to the House Judiciary Committee, chaired by Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y. Four constitutional lawyers joined the hearing as expert (as distinguished from fact) witnesses, although much of the eight-hour hearing was taken up by monologues by various legislators using their five-minute allotments to maximize their television exposure. Michael Gerhardt, a law professor at the University of North Carolina, said in his opening statement that the allegations against Trump clearly met the standard for impeachment. “If what we're talking about is not impeachable, then nothing is impeachable,” said Gerhardt.

  • Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren suggest Kamala Harris could be their pick for VP
    The Independent

    Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren suggest Kamala Harris could be their pick for VP

    Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren have suggested they could pick Kamala Harris as their candidate for vice-president after she dropped out of the Democratic primary race. Mr Biden, a former vice-president, told reporters he spoke to Ms Harris on Tuesday and believes she is a strong potential running mate. “Look, Senator Harris has the capacity to be anything she wants to be,” he said.

  • Unforgettable Photos From The Attack On Pearl Harbor, 73 Years Ago Today
    Business Insider

    Unforgettable Photos From The Attack On Pearl Harbor, 73 Years Ago Today

    On the morning of December 7, 1941, an attack planned by Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto to demobilize the US Navy was carried out. APAround 7 a.m., an Army radar operator spotted the first wave of the Japanese planes. APThe Japanese also took the opportunity to attack military airfields while bombing the fleet in Pearl Harbor.

  • 'Jews are France', says Emmanuel Macron after 107 Jewish graves  desecrated in anti-Semitic attack
    The Telegraph

    'Jews are France', says Emmanuel Macron after 107 Jewish graves  desecrated in anti-Semitic attack

    President Emmanuel Macron has pledged to fight anti-Semitism saying “Jews are and make France” after 107 graves were desecrated at a Jewish cemetery in the northeast of the country. The daubing of swastikas and other anti-Semitic graffiti on the graves at the cemetery in Westhoffen around 15 miles west of Strasbourg in the Alsace region was the latest racist attack to shock the country. "Jews are and make France," President Emmanuel Macron wrote on Twitter on Tuesday.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Russia suspends revamp work at Iran's Fordow nuclear plant

    Russian state nuclear company Rosatom has suspended work on revamping a factory at Iran's Fordow nuclear complex due to an issue with uranium compatibility, Rosatom's nuclear fuel cycle unit TVEL said on Thursday. "Uranium enrichment and the production of stable isotopes cannot be carried out in the same room," TVEL said in a statement, adding that it was "technologically impossible" to implement the project at this time. In November, the United States said it would cease waiving punitive sanctions related to the Fordow plant from Dec. 15 - a move Russia condemned - after Tehran resumed uranium enrichment at the underground site in contravention of a nuclear deal it signed with world powers in 2015.

  • Big delays at US-Mexico border crossings after migrants use car lanes to claim asylum
    USA TODAY

    Big delays at US-Mexico border crossings after migrants use car lanes to claim asylum

    NOGALES, Sonora – Lane closures, resulting in lengthier wait times to cross into the United States, have returned indefinitely to the ports of entry along the Arizona-Mexico border as asylum-seeking migrants are increasingly attempting to cross through car lanes at the ports. Wait times to cross at one port of entry along the border dividing Arizona and Mexico increased to as much as 11 hours over the weekend, according to some drivers, because the lane closures coincided with Thanksgiving, already a busy time at the border crossings.

  • Climate models have been right all along, study finds
    CBS News

    Climate models have been right all along, study finds

    The study comes as climate skeptics continue to cast doubt on the reliability of climate models and question the validity of human-caused climate change overall. "We often hear that 'models always overestimate warming' from those skeptical of climate change," says the paper's lead author Zeke Hausfather. But Hausfather says that's simply not true.

  • Missile Shield: Romania Now Has America's Aegis Ashore
    The National Interest

    Missile Shield: Romania Now Has America's Aegis Ashore

    Key point: Washington has wanted to expand NATO's anti-missile capabilities for a while now. A key NATO missile-defense site in Romania on Aug. 9, 2019 completed a three-month upgrade process that had forced operators to take the system offline. To fill the resulting gap in coverage, the U.S. Army in May 2019 deployed to Romania one of its seven Terminal High-Altitude Area-Defense missile-interceptor batteries.

  • 3 charged over Australia’s largest crystal meth seizure
    Associated Press

    3 charged over Australia’s largest crystal meth seizure

    Two customs agents and an information technology worker appeared in a court on Thursday charged with drug offenses over Australia's largest seizure of methamphetamine, which had been smuggled to Melbourne from Bangkok in stereo speakers. Police estimate the 1.6 metric tons (1.7 U.S. tons) of the drug also known as ice and crystal meth had a street value of AU$1.197 billion ($818 million). The 37 kilograms (82 pounds) of heroin also seized was the largest haul of that drug in Australia since 2017, police said.

  • FBI Failed to Inform FISA Court that Steele Dossier was Unreliable: Report
    National Review

    FBI Failed to Inform FISA Court that Steele Dossier was Unreliable: Report

    The Justice Department's inspector general has concluded that the FBI omitted crucial details in its requests for warrants to surveil Trump campaign associate Carter Page, saying the agency neglected to mention that some of the information the warrant applications were based on was shaky. Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz's yet unpublished draft report found that the FBI did not inform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that the controversial Steele dossier, cited in applications to spy on Page, was unreliable, according to the Washington Post. The dossier was compiled by former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele who was investigating Donald Trump for an opposition research firm hired by the Hillary Clinton campaign.

  • 'In cold blood': Syria Kurds say killed, robbed by Turkey proxies
    AFP

    'In cold blood': Syria Kurds say killed, robbed by Turkey proxies

    Syrian Kurdish mother Shara Sido says the news came to her via a messaging application. Sitting inside a modest house in the de-facto Syrian Kurdish capital of Qamishli, the displaced 65-year-old scrolls through her phone to find a picture. Turkish troops and their Syrian proxies have overrun a swathe of northern Syria since October, after a deadly military campaign against Kurdish forces that caused tens of thousands to flee their homes.

  • Pakistan pulls back on prosecuting Chinese sex traffickers
    Yahoo News Video

    Pakistan pulls back on prosecuting Chinese sex traffickers

    Pakistan has declined to pursue a sprawling case against Chinese sex traffickers due to fears it would harm economic ties with Beijing, the AP reported on Wednesday. Pakistan has been seeking closer ties with China for years as Beijing continue to make major investments in the country's infrastructure.

  • Tesla refused to help the police with an investigation into stolen copper wire after Elon Musk learned about the incident because the company was scared of bad press
    Business Insider

    Tesla refused to help the police with an investigation into stolen copper wire after Elon Musk learned about the incident because the company was scared of bad press

    Tesla declined to help local authorities with an investigation into stolen copper wire at its factory in Sparks, Nevada, out of fear that it could make the electric-car maker look bad, the Reno Gazette Journal's Benjamin Spillman reported, citing a police report from June 2018. Tesla security employees reportedly told the Storey County Sheriff's Department that the contractor who first alerted authorities about the stolen copper wire was fired after making the report. Tesla declined to assist authorities on other occasions amid reports of "rampant crime" in 2018, according to the Reno Gazette Journal's report.

  • Reuters

    Nepal makes first arrest over 'menstrual hut' death

    KATHMANDU, Dec 5 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Police in Nepal have arrested the brother-in-law of a woman who died after she was banished to a 'menstrual hut', the first such arrest in the Himalayan nation as it seeks to end the practice. The body of Parbati Buda Rawat, 21, was found on Monday after she lit a fire to keep warm in a mud and stone hut and suffocated in Nepal's western Achhan district, the latest victim of the centuries-old, "chhaupadi" custom, outlawed in 2005. "This is the first time we have arrested any person in connection with a death under the chhaupadi custom," Achham's chief district officer, Bhoj Raj Shrestha, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

  • When her 4-year-old son died, she wanted a home funeral. A professional didn't know that was possible
    USA TODAY

    When her 4-year-old son died, she wanted a home funeral. A professional didn't know that was possible

    When an accident took the life of her 4-year-old son, Keelia Carver wanted to take his body back to the family ranch, his home. “Why would that body not be ours to spend time with?” said Carver, who grew up in Lane County and now lives in Maupin. The Carver family went to work to bring the body of their eldest son, Max, home, and later, after cutting through red tape, lay him to rest on their property.

  • Majority of climate simulation models have accurately predicted global heating since 1970s, study finds
    The Telegraph

    Majority of climate simulation models have accurately predicted global heating since 1970s, study finds

    Climate models have accurately predicted global heating for the past 50 years, a study by climate scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NASA has found. The study found that computer models dating back to 1970, which were used to simulate what heat-trapping gases will do to global temperatures, were reliable in forecasting the physical response of the climate system to continued increases in the greenhouse effect. Recent climate model projections have found that even if countries follow through with current and anticipated climate policies, the world is still on track to reach about 3C above pre-industrial figures by 2100, a situation the UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change has warned against.