Sarah Ferguson joins Princess Beatrice, Princess Eugenie for call with cancer patients

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Sarah Ferguson continues to support the Teenager Cancer Trust and has recruited her daughters Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie to take part.

Ferguson, the Duchess of York, was joined by Eugenie, while Beatrice called in from a separate location. During the call, founders Dr. Adrian Whiteson and Myrna Whiteson thanked Ferguson for her support over the past three decades.

The founders expressed to Beatrice and Eugenie that they "must be very proud of Mum because she has such humility and such empathy with patients," per the video shared by Hello! magazine.

Princess Beatrice, Princess Eugenie joined Sarah Ferguson during an emotional call with cancer patients. <span class="copyright">Photo by David M Benett</span>
Princess Beatrice, Princess Eugenie joined Sarah Ferguson during an emotional call with cancer patients. Photo by David M Benett

Ferguson responded with making a heart with her fingers while Eugenie smiled as she hugged her mother. Beatrice appeared to wipe tears from her eyes.

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During the call, Whiteson hinted that the charity is ready for the next generation of royals to get involved. Beatrice’s daughter, Sienna, is 10 months and Eugenie’s son, August, 1, are expected to get involved as they grow up.

"I just wonder when we enlist the little ones?" Whiteson said.

"Sienna's already a lifelong patron," Beatrice replied.

The royals spoke with two women, Michelle and Nella, about their experience with blood cancer and how the charity helped them during their battles.

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Michelle shared that it was helpful to have her family and partner in the treatment facility since the new buildings have plenty of room for guests. Nella said she was shocked when a nurse offered her a PlayStation 4.

"I was like, 'What? This is a hospital,'" Nella said on the video call. "It was almost quite shocking. Just to have that sense of normality being brought to you really helped."

Ferguson has been a part of the Teenage Cancer Trust for three decades and her daughters are also getting involved. <span class="copyright">Photo by Jason LaVeris</span>
Ferguson has been a part of the Teenage Cancer Trust for three decades and her daughters are also getting involved. Photo by Jason LaVeris

Ferguson helped to launch a new specialist hematology ward at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

"This is a special charity that's so very close to my heart," Ferguson said in a statement shared on the charity’s website. "Cancer doesn't just devastate a young person's health, it threatens to take away everything they care about — their identity, their independence, and their dreams. Teenage Cancer Trust's specialist nurses and youth workers provide the very best care and support during treatment and beyond, making sure that cancer doesn't stop young people living their lives."

"I opened the first Teenage Cancer Trust unit for young people in London in 1990, and 32 years later, to be here with my daughters, helping to open this new blood cancer ward at UCLH, is truly remarkable," Ferguson said. "We are all honored to be a part of this incredible charity."