A weekly update on entertaining people, places and events

·2 min read
From left, Wes Studi plays Bucky, Gary Farmer as Uncle Brownie, Paulina Alexis as WIllie Jack and Lane Factor as Cheese in "Run," the second episode of "Reservation Dogs" Season 2, now streaming on Hulu.
From left, Wes Studi plays Bucky, Gary Farmer as Uncle Brownie, Paulina Alexis as WIllie Jack and Lane Factor as Cheese in "Run," the second episode of "Reservation Dogs" Season 2, now streaming on Hulu.

Welcome to the See & Do Oklahoma newsletter, bringing you weekly updates on entertaining people, places, events and attractions across the state.

The pack is back.

The critically acclaimed, made-in-Oklahoma television series "Reservation Dogs" premiered its second season this week on Hulu, and the excitement was palpable. Last year, the coming-of-age comedy blazed trails with its first season, becoming not only the first mainstream TV show on which every writer, director and series regular performer is Indigenous but also the first full-time, scripted network television series to film entirely in Oklahoma.

Three of the series' Native American actors walked the red carpet at the Season 2 premiere last week in Tulsa, and we've got the scoop on what they were saying about the new episodes.

But "Reservation Dogs" isn't the only newly title on Hulu that's showcasing First Nations talents in front of and behind the cameras. The sci-fi action vehicle "Prey," a prequel to the long-running "Predator" franchise that's set in the Comanche Nation in the 1700s, debuts on Hulu Friday. Allow us to introduce you to producer Jhane Myers, a Comanche and Blackfeet artist, dancer and filmmaker who hails from Oklahoma, who worked to ensure the movie was authentic, accurate and showcased the Comanche language.

In other film news, meet some of the Oklahoma short filmmakers who working in the Sooner State these days, includine a couple who are showing their work this weekend at Enid's FLY Film Festival.

Plus, pump the brakes and take a moment to learn about an attention-grabbing new feature on downtown Oklahoma City's Autmobile Alley: Mexican artist Gonzalo Lebrija was in town this week to help with the installation of his monumental sculpture "Breve historia del tiempo" at Campbell Art Park at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center. His sculpture of a 1975 Plymouth Duster hover vertically over a 50-foot long pool of water driving attention toward a major exhibition the art center is planning next month.

This article originally appeared on Oklahoman: See & Do Oklahoma: A weekly update on entertaining people, places and events