Selena Gomez Just Spent The Weekend Helping To Solve A Cold Case Murder In Chicago

Emily Becker
Photo credit: Tibrina Hobson - Getty Images

From Women's Health

  • Selena Gomez and her mother attended CrimeCon in Chicago this past weekend.
  • At the event, attendees go over a real cold case file to try to help officials develop new ideas.
  • The "Rare" singer and other participants analyzed a murder in Cleveland in 1981.

When Selena Gomez packed for her recent trip to Chicago, the musician and actress made sure to pack her sleuthing skills. The "Lose You to Love Me" singer revealed via Instagram that she and her mom, Mandy Teefey, spent the weekend in the Windy City snapping photos at The Bean, having coffee in Millennium Park and, oh yeah, attending CrimeCon where Selena worked with other amateur detectives to solve an almost 40-year-old cold case murder.

The true crime event bills itself as "equal parts education and experience" and "so much more than murder recreations and dramatic courtroom showdowns." Crowdsolve, the CrimeCon event that Selena and Mandy attended, brought together experts, law enforcement officers, and hundreds of attendees to work on a real murder case that is currently unsolved. After going through the case file, including witness statements, timelines, and persons of interest, each attendee fills out a "Case Action Report" with their own analysis of the case that is then given to law enforcement, according to the site.

The goal of the event is to "work alongside the police and our world-class experts to help develop new ideas and leads in a cold case."

In Chicago, Selena, her mom, and other sleuths were tasked with analyzing the murder of Kurt Sova, who disappeared in the Cleveland suburbs in October 1981. Kurt disappeared from a Halloween party one night, and his body was found five days later.

CrimeCon confirmed Selena and her mom attended the event with a photo on their Instagram.

"We were honored to host @selenagomez and her mom @mandyteefey at CrowdSolve this weekend," the caption on the post reads. "They were perfect detectives 🕵️🕵️ who, along with hundreds of others, helped bring peace to the Sova family."

Kurt's brother Kevin was also at the event held February 21 to 23. According to CrimeCon's Instagram, there wasn't a dry eye in the house when Kevin addressed attendees and thanked them for their work.

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