Senator Amy Klobuchar Ends Her 2020 Campaign and Will Support Biden

Hunter DeRensis

This afternoon Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota announced the suspension of her presidential campaign. Her departure comes on the heels of Pete Buttigieg, who ended his campaign yesterday. Both candidates are expected to give their endorsements to former Vice President Joe Biden at a rally in Dallas this evening. This rush to Biden, in the days after his blowout victory in the South Carolina primary, stands as a final maneuver by Democratic Party moderates to prevent the nomination of democratic socialist Bernie Sanders.

Klobuchar began her “Amy for America” presidential campaign in February of last year, making her announcement in the middle of a Minnesota snowfall. The two-term senator pitched herself as a successful legislator who was able to work across the isle to achieve actionable political results. Her homespun demeanor and flat, midwestern humor made her, in in supporter’s minds, the perfect candidate to retake the Rust Belt from President Trump in 2020.

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