Setting the record straight on some Trail Blazer misinformation

Dwight Jaynes

Setting the record straight on some Trail Blazer misinformation that is on the verge of becoming fact to people who weren't there.

  • The whole idea that Trail Blazer fans quit going to games because they didn't like the "Jail Blazers" is not true. In fact, many times I watched those fans give standing ovations to J.R. Rider, Ruben Patterson and the rest -- as long as they were winning. There was no rebellion at all during those times -- as long as the team was playing well. The revolt came when it became obvious that the team, as it was assembled, was not going to win. Then, and only then, did the behavior became an issue.
  • Brandon Roy was a terrific Trail Blazer and it was a shame his career was cut short. But to give him credit for somehow changing the culture here is going a little too far. Paul Allen, and only Paul Allen, could do that. And he did, by parting ways with Bob Whitsitt in 2003 and putting a new emphasis on obtaining players of character.
  • I've never cared much about whose number hangs in the rafters of Moda Center. Retire Roy's number? Fine. But the whole idea that Carmelo Anthony couldn't wear Roy's No. 7 was silly. That's a Hall of Fame player, right there. And No. 7 has still not been retired. Melo should have been, out of respect, handed that number when he walked in the door -- and if they wanted to retire it later, fine. Bob Gross wore No 30 and so did Terry Porter. Both of them have their number retired.
  • Once and for all, and I think all the local fans seem to understand this, but the national media doesn't -- do not expect Portland to make a major trade strictly to save this season. Anything this franchise does will be with the future in mind. As it should.
  • "Recency bias" rears its ugly head on things like retired numbers. I hear people talk about who they think are worthy and they are usually only players they've seen play -- with the exception of Bill Walton and Maurice Lucas. Barely anyone mentions Geoff Petrie, the original Trail Blazer and a man who would average more than 30 points a game with the three-point line and today's defensive rules. I understand the bias, but really --history is your friend, even in sports.

Setting the record straight on some Trail Blazer misinformation originally appeared on NBC Sports Northwest