'Several' Capitol Police Officers Suspended Due to Their Behavior During Riots, USCP Chief Says

Eric Todisco

Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty U.S. Capitol building breached

Several United States Capitol Police officers have been suspended for their behavior during last week's deadly pro-Donald Trump riot in Washington, D.C.

Acting U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman said in a statement on Monday that the suspensions came after the department reviewed video and other source materials of USCP officers and officials that "appear to be in violation of Department regulations and policies" during the riot.

"Our Office of Professional Responsibility will investigate these behaviors for disciplinary action, up to, and including, termination," Pittman said.

During a Zoom call with reporters earlier on Monday, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, who chairs one of the committees that oversees the Capitol Police, claimed that two USCP officers were suspended. One allegedly took a selfie with a member of the pro-Trump mob during the insurrection, while the other wore a "Make America Great Again" hat and started directing people around the building, Ryan said.

Ryan, 47, also said that there are between 10 and 15 USCP officers under investigation, though he did not share any additional information about the extent of the investigations.

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Trump supporters clash with police at the Capitol on Wednesday

The violence on Jan. 6 led to the deaths of five people, including Capitol Police officer Officer Brian D. Sicknick, 42, who died at 9:30 p.m. Thursday from injuries he sustained "while physically engaging with protesters" during the rampage.

Howard Liebengood, an off-duty USCP officer who responded to the violent riots, died by suicide on Sunday, a lawyer representing the Liebengood family said in a statement obtained by PEOPLE.

RELATED: Why Were Police Unprepared for Riot Incited by Trump — and Why Were So Few People Arrested?

Just one day after the riots, Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund submitted his letter of resignation, informing the members of the Capitol Police Board that his resignation will go into effect on Jan. 16.

"It has been a pleasure and true honor to serve the United States Capitol Police Board and the Congressional community alongside and the women and men of the United States Capitol Police," reads Sund's letter of resignation, which was tweeted by Politico's Heather Caygle.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had called for the firing of Sund in the wake of a violent riot at the Capitol. During a press conference on Thursday, Pelosi claimed that Sund "hasn't even called" since the act of insurrection.

"There was a failure of leadership at the top of the Capitol Police," Pelosi said.

Tom Williams/Getty Images Steven Sund (right)

RELATED: How Teachers Across the U.S. Explained the 'Traumatic' Capitol Riots to Their Young Students

According to the Capitol Police, more than 50 officers from the department and Metropolitan Police Department sustained injuries, while several of them were "hospitalized with serious injuries."

"The violent attack on the U.S. Capitol was unlike any I have ever experienced in my 30 years in law enforcement here in Washington, D.C.," Sund said in a previous statement, adding, "Make no mistake – these mass riots were not First Amendment activities; they were criminal riotous behavior."