Severe storms to keep packing a punch in Northeast

Severe storms to keep packing a punch in Northeast
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Parts of the northeastern United States will be dealt another widespread threat for damaging winds from severe thunderstorms into Thursday evening.

Severe storms prowled the Northeast for the third afternoon and evening in a row on Tuesday and accounted for more than 200 of the 235 or so wind damage reports across the nation listed by the Storm Prediction Center (SPC).

The storms uprooted trees and knocked down power lines from southeastern Indiana, Ohio and West Virginia to coastal Maine Tuesday and Tuesday night.

A wedge of dry air kept storms away from much of the region at midweek, outside of a pocket of severe storms that swept through central and southern Ohio.

The regional severe weather event continued through Thursday evening. Storms that rolled through part of the Northeast during the morning hours were not associated with the main severe weather threat but rather more storms that will fire up in their wake later on.

This radar image, captured at 1:30 p.m. EDT, Thursday, August 27, 2020, shows thunderstorms erupting over part of the northeastern United States. The storms were advancing southeastward. (AccuWeather)

Into Thursday evening, reports of severe weather spanned from the eastern Ohio to Massachusetts, Connecticut and southeastern New York state, including the New York City area.

Two injuries were reported in the Northeast on Thursday from the severe weather. In Snyder County, Pennsylvania, one person was injured after a tree fell down on a camper at Little Mexico Campground, causing a head injury. Another injury was reported in Fairfield County, Connecticut, after wires and a tree fell down on a car, trapping people inside. When one individual tried to get out they were shocked.

In addition, some hail was reported in New York state across multiple counties, ranging from dime to quarter in size.

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"South of the main severe weather threat zone, from southern Ohio to the southern tier of Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey to Virginia, a few heavy, gusty thunderstorms can develop in the hot and humid air, but severe weather in this area is likely to be more isolated in nature," Anderson said.

On Friday, the threat of severe storms may focus more toward the Midwest once again, before shifting back into the Northeast on Saturday.

During the first part of this weekend, the combination of Laura and a non-tropical system is forecast to raise the potential for heavy, gusty and locally severe thunderstorms in the mid-Atlantic and New England. There is the potential for isolated tornadoes and waterspouts on Saturday from eastern Virginia through the Delmarva Peninsula, including waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware bays.

Laura made landfall near Cameron, Louisiana, early Thursday morning as a Category 4 hurricane.

"Even though Laura is forecast to weaken significantly after spending several days over land, including the higher terrain of the southern Appalachians, it has a significant chance to redevelop into a tropical storm off the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coasts from Sunday to Sunday night as it moves away from the U.S.," AccuWeather's top hurricane expert Dan Kottlowski said.

There is the potential for a second landfall over southeastern Newfoundland later Monday.

Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.