Sidney Powell and other Trump attorneys oversaw effort to copy sensitive election data in 3 states, per reports

Sidney Powell and other Trump attorneys oversaw effort to copy sensitive election data in 3 states, per reports
·2 min read
Rudy Giuliani; Sidney Powell
Sidney Powell, attorney for President Donald Trump, conducts a news conference at the Republican National Committee on lawsuits regarding the outcome of the 2020 presidential election on Thursday, November 19, 2020.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
  • A team of computer experts successfully breached Georgia election files in January 2021, reports say.

  • Trump attorney Sidney Powell reportedly helped oversee the effort in Georgia and two other states.

  • The Washington Post and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained documents revealing the scope of the effort.

A group of Trump-allied attorneys oversaw an effort to copy sensitive election data in at least three battleground states following the 2020 presidential election, according to The Washington Post.

Embattled Trump attorney Sidney Powell helped coordinate with a team of computer experts who succeeded in breaching Georgia election files in rural Coffee County and accessing election data that included voter check-in computers and ballot memory cards, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Local election officials reportedly gave the group access to equipment that was meant to be protected.

Atlanta-area tech company SullivanStrickler billed Powell more than $26,000 for its work, according to the outlets, which also included attempts to access similar election data in Antrim County, Michigan, and Clark County, Nevada.

Powell did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation confirmed to The Journal-Constitution on Tuesday that it has opened a criminal investigation into the Coffee County breach, which took place one day after the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021.

Details about the breach and related efforts came to light last week through a subpoena issued to SullivanStrickler as part of an ongoing federal lawsuit over the security of Georgia's voting systems. Emails, texts, and other records produced on Friday indicate that the extent of the endeavor was more successful than previously reported.

"The breach is way beyond what we thought," David Cross, a lawyer representing the plaintiffs in the Georgia election lawsuit told The Post. "The scope of it is mind-blowing."

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