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'Significant' vulnerabilities in Microsoft's Exchange servers -WH

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White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the vulnerability posed "an active threat" that could have far-reaching consequences.

"We're concerned that there are a large number of victims," she said.

More than 20,000 American organizations have been compromised through a back door installed via a recently patched flaw in Microsoft Corp's flagship email software program, a person familiar with the U.S. government's response to the hacking spree said on Friday.

Video Transcript

JEN PSAKI: Go ahead Trevor.

- Just a couple on technology. You had a statement out from Jake Sullivan last night on the Microsoft related breach. Just curious if that affected any government computers, departments, agencies? And any more color or detail around that.

JEN PSAKI: Sure. This isn't-- and for anyone who didn't see National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan's tweet last night, he spoke to the Microsoft breach that's been reported. But, this is his significant vulnerability that could have far reaching impacts. First and foremost, this is an active threat. And as the National Security Advisor tweeted last night, everyone running these servers-- government, private sector, academia-- needs to act now to patch them. We are concerned that there are large number of victims and are working with our partners to understand the scope of this. So it's an ongoing process, Trevor, I would say.

Network owners also need to consider whether they have already been compromised and should immediately take appropriate steps. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency issued an emergency directive to agencies. And we're now looking closely at the next steps we need to take. It's still developing. We urge network operators to take it very seriously. But I don't have any other readouts beyond that.