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Sisters who own floral design shop commemorating Tulsa Race Massacre

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Lauren and Leah Palmer are sisters and together they own The Wild Mother, a creative floral studio in downtown Oklahoma City.

Video Transcript

LAUREN PALMER: Artists tend to be the culture-shapers.

TAYLOR ADAMS: Lauren and Leah Palmer are sisters, artists, and storytellers. Together, they own The Wild Mother Creative Studio, a local floral design shop in the heart of downtown Oklahoma City. For months now, they've been envisioning a way for their business to honor the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre.

LEAH PALMER: There's so much that has been hidden, and in a lot of ways, stolen from us and from our collective identity. And I don't just mean us as sisters. I mean, us as Oklahomans, as Americans.

TAYLOR ADAMS: They say they want their art to tell the true stories of the lives forever changed. #SendFlowersToGreenwood will send love and support both virtually and physically.

LAUREN PALMER: To create art as medicine for a community that has long been overlooked and fallen victim to revisionist history.

LEAH PALMER: We want to tell a narrative through flowers.

TAYLOR ADAMS: And a lot of hard work, too, as they begin work on two huge floral installations for commemorative events in Tulsa.

LEAH PALMER: We have tens of thousands of blooms that we will be processing alongside of 20 or 25 other floral designers.

TAYLOR ADAMS: And they're also asking other artists to join in virtually by creating their own original art and posting to social media with the #SendFlowersToGreenwood.

LAUREN PALMER: We're asking as they share on social media that they would accompany the images they capture of that work with which the true story of Greenwood.

TAYLOR ADAMS: All to honor those who came before them and to make sure their stories are never forgotten.

LEAH PALMER: It's not lost on us how significant this year is and how-- how powerful artists can be in the community.

TAYLOR ADAMS: Taylor Adams, Oklahoma's News 4