A small-business owner who spent nearly $46 million on Facebook advertising says he's been booted from the platform without explanation

Allana Akhtar
FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2019, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Georgetown University in Washington. Zuckerberg isn't budging over his refusal to take action on inflammatory posts by President Donald Trump that spread misinformation about voting by mail and, many said, encouraged violence against protesters. (AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Associated Press
  • Jordan Nabigon, the CEO of the content-curation site Shared, spent nearly $46 million on Facebook advertising before the platform booted him without warning or explanation, he said.

  • Facebook said Nabigon's company violated the site's terms and conditions but did not elaborate further "due to safety and security." Several of his company pages have been unpublished since October 26.

  • "We didn't do anything wrong and I'm confident in that," Nabigon said in an interview with Business Insider. "There's no way it was worth this kind of reaction from Facebook."

  • Nabigon and other small-business owners say they've struggled to get in touch with Facebook customer service to remedy issues with advertising.

  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

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A small-business owner who spent nearly $46 million on Facebook ads said he got booted from the platform without warning.

Jordan Nabigon, the CEO of the Ottawa, Ontario, content-curation site Shared, said Facebook deleted his company's main Facebook page without warning in October, and without providing an explanation. He shared a Medium post detailing his experience, which has received more than 400 "claps" from readers.

Nabigon spent $45,870,181 on Facebook advertising between 2006 and 2020 for Shared and his other company Freebies, according to expense reports reviewed by Business Insider.

Facebook increased its use of artificial intelligence to oversee advertising and other content during the COVID-19 pandemic, and Nabigon is among hundreds of business owners who said they suffered from Facebook's crackdown on ad policies.

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"We didn't do anything wrong and I'm confident in that," Nabigon said in an interview with Business Insider. "Even if there was something that was off, there's no way it was worth this kind of reaction from Facebook."

According to Nabigon, Facebook told him he had violated the platform's terms and conditions but did not elaborate further "due to safety and security." The small-business owner said Facebook gave him no warning it could or would unpublish his pages and that Facebook told him the decision was final.

Facebook representatives did not respond to multiple requests for additional comment.

Nabigon lost several company pages that had amassed 21 million followers because of the faulty violations, he said. Facebook has also locked Nabigon out of his personal account.

Business Insider's Tyler Sonnemaker spoke with seven other business owners, who run ads for companies that sell things like dog products and women's jewelry and said they lost revenue because of Facebook glitches.

And small-business owners, including Nabigon, said they struggled getting in touch with Facebook ad representatives to get help fixing problems.

In 2010, Adweek reported Facebook assigned an account representative if an account spent more than $10,000 on ads. But Facebook's website now says the company assigns advertisers with account managers "proactively."

"Currently, there is no process for advertisers to request a personal Account Manager," Facebook's website says. "If it's determined your account would benefit from additional account management resources, we will reach out to you directly."

Nabigon said between 2012 and 2017 he worked with representatives at the Facebook Toronto office to get personalized help reading the site's advertising policy and ensuring company pages stayed violation-free. Nabigon said Facebook employees reached out to him directly and met with him for hourlong counseling sessions.

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But in 2017, Facebook emailed Nabigon telling him he would not have an account representative "for the time being." He and other executives instead emailed customer service, which could provide only "canned answers" regarding the company's violation and offered little additional help, Nabigon said. Shared's company pages have been unpublished since October 26.

"I think there's a lot of strength in keeping the real people who are supposed to be monitoring the AI or the policy enforcement," Nabigon said. "We need somebody to look at the nuance and the complexity of our business, especially considering our history with [Facebook] is long."

Read the original article on Business Insider