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The South braces for more freezing temperatures

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The freezing temperatures across the South are expected to linger while the winter storm heads to the East Coast. CBS New York chief weathercaster Lonnie Quinn is tracking the storm.

Video Transcript

NORAH O'DONNELL: And all that snow and ice is headed east. CBS's Lonnie Quinn is tracking the storm. Hey there, Lonnie.

LONNIE QUINN: Well, good evening to you, Norah, and good evening, everyone. I believe that ice is the most treacherous thing that mother nature can put down, and right now, if I can take your attention to the radar picture, look at the pink. All right, from-- we're talking I-20, from the western portion of Louisiana all the way to the Eastern portion of Mississippi, it is ice that we're dealing with on that roadway, and that is so treacherous. The most important thing that we can address is how much longer, And the computer models suggest about five hours more of that icing event.

All the while, south of it, a tornado risk along the Gulf Coast. That storm system is going to move into the mid-Atlantic by tomorrow, so North Carolina all the way up to Maryland, you're looking at the possibility for some freezing rain, maybe mixed with some snow up around Maryland, and then it becomes all snow on Friday as it makes its way into New England.

So, how much snow? Well, for a place like Washington D.C., Philadelphia, you have modest numbers. Maybe three to six inches or so. New York City, about a six to nine-inch range. But I've got to leave you with this, there is light at the end of the tunnel. The cold is going to snap in the south. It's still cold in San Antonio on Saturday morning. I mean, you're starting off your day in San Antonio 26 on Saturday. It's 63 by Monday, and Norah, it will be 73 by the time we get to Wednesday afternoon. That's probably something that your folks in San Antonio are a little bit more accustomed to this time of year.

NORAH O'DONNELL: I know, my hometown. Believe me, those warm days can't come soon enough. Lonnie Quinn, thank you.