Terminally ill man tackled to the ground by six police officers after mooning speed camera as part of his 'bucket list' before dying

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Watch: Six cops violently detain terminally man for mooning his bum at speed camera

A terminally ill retired lecturer was tackled to the ground by six police officers after mooning a speed camera as part of his “bucket list” before dying.

Darrell Meekcom, 55, was told last month that he had a rare neurodegenerative condition and has “a very short time to live”, prompting him to write a list of activities to do while he can.

Among them was the unconventional dream to flash a speed camera after being irritated by years of being caught for “silly speeds" only marginally over the limit.

Darrell Meekcom mooned a speed camera as part of his bucket list, describing it as a 'good laugh' - SWNS
Darrell Meekcom mooned a speed camera as part of his bucket list, describing it as a 'good laugh' - SWNS

Last Friday, Mr Meekcom, who used to lecture medical students at Birmingham City University, targeted a mobile speed camera van near his home in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, describing it as "a good laugh”.

But the long-held wish did not go down well with officers in West Mercia Police, who arrested the father of two for indecent exposure after an officer in the van caught Mr Meekcom in the act.

"Have you never wanted to moonie a speed camera? Well I did," he told the officers after they arrested him at his home last Friday.

Just 20 minutes after the incident, three police cars arrived at the home of Mr Meekcom, who also has Parkinson's disease and heart and kidney problems, demanding to be let in. When he refused, officers kicked down the garden gate before wrestling him to the ground to put him in handcuffs, he claimed.

Mr Meekcom claimed police 'destroyed my front door and smashed the back gate to pieces' - Sarah Meekcom/SWNS
Mr Meekcom claimed police 'destroyed my front door and smashed the back gate to pieces' - Sarah Meekcom/SWNS

Mobile phone footage filmed by his wife Sarah, 36, a nurse, shows Mr Meekcom calmly telling officers: "I'm terminally ill, I won't be able to breathe like this.

"This is ridiculous - I moonied a speed camera. I moonied a speed camera."

One female officer can be heard replying: "Well, that is a significant statement that you have just made to us," to which Mr Meekcom replied: "I'm quite happy to say that because it was one off my bucket list.”

Mr Meekcom, a wheelchair user, criticised the police response, saying it was “completely disproportionate”.

"Despite coming out to the police to give myself up, they destroyed my front door and smashed the back gate to pieces,” he said.

"There were six of them restraining me trying to get their arms up my back. All this for mooning a speed camera.”

Mr Meekcom criticised police for their response, saying it was 'completely disproportionate' - Sarah Meekcom/SWNS
Mr Meekcom criticised police for their response, saying it was 'completely disproportionate' - Sarah Meekcom/SWNS

Mr Meekcom, who has two daughters aged eight and 10, was diagnosed with multiple system atrophy last month, for which the life expectancy is around six years.

The other activities on his bucket list include a bungee jump, skydive and streaking at a Worcester Warriors rugby game.

"I have always been a goody two shoes, I've never been in trouble with the law before and I want to let my hair down now considering my prognosis,” he said.

A spokesman for West Mercia Police said: “Around 1pm on Friday, November 5, officers received a report of indecent exposure in Stourbridge Road. Officers attended and after a search of the area, located a person of interest in Coiey Close.

“A 55-year-old man from Kidderminster was arrested on suspicion of public order offences and dangerous driving and released on bail. Enquiries are ongoing.”

In HM Inspector of Constabulary's most recent assessment of the force's effectiveness, West Mercia Police was identified as requiring improvement on the extent to which it is effective at reducing crime and keeping people safe.

Wendy Williams, the inspector, said she was concerned that crimes are "not always allocated to appropriately trained staff and that they are not investigated thoroughly enough or supervised effectively".

In January, the force said snowball fights were not a justifiable reason for people to leave their houses during lockdown and issued a warning that this "behaviour is likely to result in a £200 fixed penalty notice for breaking the lockdown rules".

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