St. Edward's Crown moved from Tower of London for King Charles' coronation

The crown that will be worn by King Charles III for his coronation has been moved from the Tower of London to prepare for his coronation next year, Buckingham Palace said Saturday.

According to Buckingham Palace, St. Edward's Crown is the crown historically used at the moment of coronation, and was made for the coronation of King Charles II in 1661. The crown has a velvet cap with an ermine band and the frame is made of solid gold set with rubies, amethysts, sapphires, garnet, topazes and tourmalines.

The current version of St. Edward's Crown was made as a replacement for a crown that was melted down in 1649. The original is believed to date back to the 11th-century royal saint Edward the Confessor, according to Buckingham Palace.

The crown is housed in the Tower of London along with the other crown jewels.

King Charles' coronation is scheduled for May 6, 2023. It will be the first coronation in the U.K. since Queen Elizabeth II's in 1953.

A photo of the St Edward's Crown, which will be worn by King Charles III on his Coronation on May 6, 2023.  / Credit: Royal Collection Trust/© His Majesty King Charles III 2022 via AP
A photo of the St Edward's Crown, which will be worn by King Charles III on his Coronation on May 6, 2023. / Credit: Royal Collection Trust/© His Majesty King Charles III 2022 via AP

The preparations for the coronation come as King Charles' son, Prince William, and William's wife, Catherine, the Princess of Wales, wrapped up a tour of Boston for their first trip to the U.S. in eight years. Highlights of the couple's trip included a meeting with President Joe Biden and the presentation of the Earthshot Prize, an award that William and David Attenborough launched in 2020 that honors environmental work.

But William and Kate's visit to the U.S. was overshadowed by a pair of controversies. William's godmother, Lady Susan Hussey, resigned as a palace aid after repeatedly asking a black British charity boss where she was "really" from. A spokesperson for William condemned the comments as "unacceptable" and said, "racism has no place in our society."

And last week, the trailer dropped for Prince Harry and his wife Meghan's Netflix documentary, which promises a behind-the-scenes look at the couple's experience with the royal family.

Both controversies come as the royal family grapples with moving forward in the wake of Queen Elizabeth II's death earlier this year after 70 years on the throne — and how to represent a modern, diverse Britain.

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