Stabbing in U.K. That Killed 3 Labeled 'Terrorist Incident'

U.K. reports say the suspect was known to British intelligence.

  • Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan
    Business Insider

    Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan

    The New York Post obtained photos showing Michael Cohen eating out at a Manhattan restaurant Thursday night. Cohen is currently serving a three-year sentence under home confinement, and eating out appears to be a violation of the conditions of his release from a federal prison camp. Business Insider reached out to the Bureau of Prisons for comment but did not immediately receive a response Saturday morning.

  • Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists
    The Independent

    Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists

    The order comes after the police arrested journalists who were covering a protest on Tuesday. One of them, Lesley McLam, was taken into custody. The restraining order declares that the police “are enjoined from arresting, threatening to arrest, or using physical force directed against any person whom they know or reasonably should know is a journalist or legal observer … unless the police have probable cause to believe that such individual has committed a crime”.

  • Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message
    CBS News

    Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message

    Evoking the names of Martin Luther King and George Floyd, Joe Biden said Saturday that the U.S. "never lived up" to its founding principle that "all men are created equal." In the Fourth of July video message, Biden said that even though America had fallen short of equality, the effort to live up to the nation's founding ideals continues. It survived the ravages of the Civil War, the dogs of Bull Connor, the assassination of Martin Luther King, and more than 200 years of systemic racism.

  • Coronavirus outbreak among students at University of Washington's frat houses
    NBC News

    Coronavirus outbreak among students at University of Washington's frat houses

    An outbreak of coronavirus cases has been reported at the University of Washington's Greek Row, the school said Friday. The public university in Seattle said that it confirmed that at least 89 fraternity house residents have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. Four students who do not live on Greek Row but had contact with residents have also tested positive.

  • See it again! Air Force, Military planes fly over Boston on Fourth of July
    Hearst WCVB

    See it again! Air Force, Military planes fly over Boston on Fourth of July

    U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps flew over in five waves in what the defense department is calling a "Salute to great cities of the American Revolution."

  • It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses
    The National Interest

    It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses

    The prospect of a peaceful Korean Unification, however remote it seems, would be a historical event worth planning for. Hoping for the best means there is a scenario where North Korea's collapse and regime change occur miraculously, opening doors to South Korea and the West to take over North Korea in what one hopes would be a peaceful absorption. In November 1989, West and East Berliners flocked to what was one of the most heavily guarded borders in the world and tore down parts of the Berlin Wall that had divided Germany for twenty-eight years.

  • China rebukes Canada over criticism of Hong Kong security law
    Reuters

    China rebukes Canada over criticism of Hong Kong security law

    China fired back at Canada on Saturday for criticising Beijing's national security law for Hong Kong, the second rebuke in a week that has added to strains of their bilateral ties. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Friday that Canada was suspending its extradition treaty with Hong Kong due to the law and Canada's foreign minister called the legislation "a significant step back" for liberty. China's embassy in Ottawa said in a statement on its website that Canada had "grossly interfered" in Chinese affairs, adding that the new legislation would safeguard security in Hong Kong.

  • India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members
    BBC

    India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members

    Eight Indian policemen have been killed, and seven more injured, in an encounter with gang members, reports say. The officers were fired upon during a raid in search of a notorious local gangster in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. The gangster, Vikas Dubey, is accused in 60 criminal cases for various offences, including attempted murder.

  • A Nigerian Instagram star conspired to launder millions of dollars while flaunting his 'extravagant lifestyle' on social media, prosecutors allege
    INSIDER

    A Nigerian Instagram star conspired to launder millions of dollars while flaunting his 'extravagant lifestyle' on social media, prosecutors allege

    "Ray Hushpuppi" regularly flaunted his extravagant wealth for more than 2 million Instagram followers in photos that boasted shiny cars and designer goods. But "Hushpuppi," or 37-year-old Ramon Olorunwa Abbas is now facing charges related to his role as a "key player in a large, transnational conspiracy" to launder hundreds of millions of dollars, prosecutors said in an arrest affidavit. Abbas and his co-conspirators used "business email compromise" schemes and "cyber-heists" to launder money from groups like a US law firm, a foreign bank, and an English Premier League soccer club, according to prosecutors.

  • 5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates
    Business Insider

    5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates

    Five Americans who attempted to enter Italy after flying on a private jet to the island of Sardinia were rejected because of the EU's coronavirus restrictions. The travellers eventually flew out of the airport 14 hours after they first landed, CNN reported. Italy was once the worst-hit country but appears to have controlled its outbreak, while the US is still dealing with virus peaks.

  • Violence mars Portland protests, frustrates Black community
    Associated Press

    Violence mars Portland protests, frustrates Black community

    Protesters in this liberal, predominantly white city have taken to the streets peacefully every day for more than five weeks to decry police brutality. As the Portland protests enter a second month, they have shifted on several nights from the city's downtown core to a historically Black neighborhood in North Portland that's already buckling under the effects of white gentrification and has the most to gain — or lose — from the outrage in the streets. Late last week, some protesters barricaded the doors to a police precinct a half-block from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and set fire to the building, which also houses Black-owned businesses, including an Ethiopian restaurant and a barber's school.

  • Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video
    The Independent

    Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video

    Visitors to a beach last week would have seen a shark-like fish soaring above their heads thanks to one bird's actions. A video shared online showed one huge predatory bird seen with what appeared to be a shark suspended in its claws above crowds at South Carolina's Myrtle Beach. The woman who witnessed the stunt, Kelly Burbage, shared the video online on Friday where she appealed for wildlife experts to name the fish and the bird.

  • Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of Control
    The Daily Beast

    Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of Control

    Democratic officials angry at Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's handling of surging coronavirus numbers in the state this week had one lackluster place to voice their frustrations about the rapidly escalating public health crisis killing their constituents: a Zoom press conference. “While some states followed the advice of public health experts, Texas did not,” Dallas-area State Rep. Toni Rose said from a webcam on Wednesday, a photograph of the Texas Capitol superimposed behind her. It was certainly not the first time Democrats in the state had inveighed against a pandemic approach criticized by some as too reckless, and followed months of power struggles between local and state leaders in Texas over lockdowns, masks, and more.

  • Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War
    The National Interest

    Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

    Fighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. When faced with fast, multi-frequency, long-range precision fire from enemy air defenses, air attackers simply must “operate at speed,” according to U.S. Air Forces, Europe Commander General Jeffrey Harrigian, who used the phrase in a discussion with The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. Harrigian, who is also now the Commander of U.S. Air Forces Africa, ran much of the air campaign during Operation Inherent Resolve against ISIS; he offered a first-hand war perspective in a conversation with retired Lieutenant General David Deptula, Dean of the Mitchell Institute.

  • For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?
    USA TODAY

    For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?

    It doesn't take long to notice a familiar pattern when it comes to one particular word in St. George, Utah. The word has been subject to much controversy in St. George over the years — and now the debate is back. In the wake of the death of George Floyd, which sparked a worldwide Black Lives Matter and protests against racial inequality and police brutality, there's been a renewed drive to abolish statues and symbols with ties to the Confederacy, white supremacy and historical racial violence.

  • China accuses Canada of meddling over Hong Kong law
    AFP

    China accuses Canada of meddling over Hong Kong law

    China on Saturday accused Canada of meddling after Ottawa said it was suspending its extradition treaty with Hong Kong to protest a tough new national security law imposed there by Beijing. In a statement published on the website of the Chinese embassy in Ottawa, a spokesperson denounced what he said were Canada's "unwarranted comments" on the new law, saying Canadian leaders had "grossly interfered in China's internal affairs." "Some Western countries including Canada have been meddling in Hong Kong affairs under the pretext of human rights, which seriously violates international law and basic norms of international relations," the statement said, adding that such efforts were "doomed to fail."

  • Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'
    Reuters

    Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'

    Denmark woke up on Friday to the words "racist fish" scrawled across the base of the "Little Mermaid", the bronze statue honouring Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tale that perches on a rock in the sea off a pier in Copenhagen. "We consider it vandalism and have started an investigation," a spokesman for the Copenhagen police said. Protesters of the Black Lives Matter movement around the world have in recent months rallied against statues of historical figures who played a role in racist oppression, such as slave traders and colonialists.

  • Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off
    BBC

    Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off

    In the weeks leading up to the clash, there were reports of scuffles between the two militaries over the Line of Actual Control (LAC), the poorly demarcated border between the two nuclear-armed powers. Deadly brawl Reports from May said that the Chinese forces put up tents, dug trenches and moved heavy equipment several kilometres inside what had been regarded by India as its territory. The move came after India built a road several hundred kilometres long connecting to a high-altitude forward air base which it reactivated in 2008.

  • American Airlines' decision to sell middle seats shows that the pandemic won't lead to more comfortable flights
    Business Insider

    American Airlines' decision to sell middle seats shows that the pandemic won't lead to more comfortable flights

    At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, people thought the new world of social distancing meant that the cramped middle airplane seat would become a thing of the past. When the coronavirus pandemic brought the world to a standstill, ushered in the age of social distancing, and indefinitely grounded most frequent flyers, the optimists focused on the worst part of modern air travel: the middle seat. "The coronavirus has effectively killed the middle seat," a Popular Mechanics article proclaimed in May. "Will empty middle seats help social distancing on planes?" the BBC asked.

  • Alleged email scammer who flaunted wealth on Instagram to face charges
    NBC News

    Alleged email scammer who flaunted wealth on Instagram to face charges

    A Nigerian man charged with conspiring to launder a fortune from email scams, and who showed off his wealth to 2.4 million Instagram followers, has arrived in the U.S. to face charges, prosecutors said Friday. Ramon Olorunwa Abbas, or “Hushpuppi” on Instagram and Snapchat, made an initial court appearance in Chicago after arriving with the FBI from the United Arab Emirates, where he had been living, prosecutors said in a statement. Abbas allegedly conspired with others to launder hundreds of millions of dollars in scams targeting a law firm, a bank and an English Premier League soccer club, according to a criminal complaint filed last month in federal court.

  • Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle
    The Telegraph

    Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle

    SEATTLE (AP) _ Two women were struck by a car whose driver sped through a protest-related closure on a freeway in Seattle, authorities said early Saturday. A 24-year-old woman from Seattle suffered critical, life-threatening injuries and a 32-year-old woman from Bellingham had serious injuries, Washington State Patrol Capt. Ron Mead said. The driver, a 27-year-old man from Seattle, was in custody, Mead said, adding that impairment was not considered a factor.

  • US supreme court gives conservatives the blues but what's really going on?
    The Guardian

    US supreme court gives conservatives the blues but what's really going on?

    For all the ominous twists of Donald Trump's presidency, his placement on the US supreme court of two deeply conservative justices, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, inspired a special kind of foreboding for many liberals. With three conservatives already sitting on the court, the creation by Trump of a seemingly impregnable, five-vote conservative supreme court majority appeared to pose a generational threat to essential American rights and freedoms. Last month, the court handed down a trio of rulings that clashed directly with Trump's agenda on the hot-button issues of abortion, immigration and LGBTQ+ rights – angering the president, tentatively pleasing progressives and leaving many court...

  • Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the Planet
    The National Interest

    Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the Planet

    Here's What You Need To Remember: Despite the date of entry being pushed back, once the Sarmat is operational, it will be fearsome—it reportedly has a range of 18,000 kilometers, or just over 11,000 miles, which would put virtually any location on the globe within range. Russia inherited a missile collection from the Soviet Union that is rival to none—arguably bigger in type and overall diversity than any other nation's missile arsenal. Although some of their intercontinental missiles are beginning to show their age, their newest, the Sarmat, would be quite dangerous.

  • Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa Guillen
    USA TODAY

    Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa Guillen

    U.S. Army officials at Fort Hood on Thursday identified the soldier who killed himself this week after he was questioned about possible involvement in the disappearance of Spc. Aaron David Robinson of Illinois, who was assigned to a building adjacent to where Guillen worked, ran away from Fort Hood on Tuesday night after officials said they found partial human remains near the Leon River. Local law enforcement later found Robinson in the 4700 block of East Rancier Avenue, east of Fort Hood near North Twin Creek Drive, where he pulled a gun and shot himself early Wednesday.

  • Indian man wears gold face mask to ward off coronavirus
    AFP

    Indian man wears gold face mask to ward off coronavirus

    An Indian man said he paid about $4,000 for a bespoke gold face mask to protect him from the coronavirus raging in the country. The precious metal covering weighs 60 grams (two ounces) and took craftsmen eight days to make, said businessman Shankar Kurhade, from the western city of Pune. "I am not sure if it will be effective to protect me from a coronavirus infection but I am taking other precautions," he added.