Stark, Summit libraries' listings for Jan. 16

·5 min read
Book stack
Book stack

Fiction

Children

“The Dreamweavers,” by G.Z. Schmidt – Twins Mei and Yun can’t wait for the Mid-Autumn Harvest Festival, even though strange things keep happening in their village. A gloomy atmosphere has settled over the land and their grandpa’s usually delicious mooncakes instead taste horrible and bitter, insulting the prince who tastes them. Determined to clear grandpa’s name, Mei, and Yun journey through the City of Ashes, visit the mysterious Jade Rabbit, and encounter a powerful poet, who makes them a pact: infiltrate the royal palace to expose a past royal injustice, and the poet will remove the curse that has ensnared their grandfather and village.

Teens

“Little Thieves,” by Margaret Owen – Vanja Schmidt knows that no gift is freely given, not even a mother's love. Vanja was Princess Gisele's dutiful servant up until a year ago. That was when Vanja's otherworldly mothers demanded a terrible price for their care, and Vanja decided to steal her future back ... by stealing Gisele's life for herself. The real Gisele is left a penniless nobody while Vanja uses an enchanted string of pearls to take her place. Now, Vanja leads a lonely but lucrative double life as princess and jewel thief, charming nobility while emptying their coffers to fund her great escape. Then, one heist away from freedom, Vanja crosses the wrong god and is cursed to an untimely end: turning into jewels, stone by stone, for her greed. Vanja has just two weeks to figure out how to break her curse and make her getaway.

Adult

“Honor,” by Thrity Umrigar – Indian American journalist Smita has returned to India to cover a story, but reluctantly: long ago she and her family left the country with no intention of ever coming back. As she follows the case of Meena – a Hindu woman attacked by members of her own village and her own family for marrying a Muslim man – Smita comes face to face with a society where tradition carries more weight than one’s own heart, and a story that threatens to unearth the painful secrets of her own past. While Meena’s fate hangs in the balance, Smita tries in every way she can to right the scales. She also finds herself increasingly drawn to Mohan, an Indian man she meets while on assignment. But the dual love stories of "Honor" are as different as the cultures of Meena and Smita themselves: Smita realizes she has the freedom to enter into a casual affair, knowing she can decide later how much it means to her.

Nonfiction

Children

“A History of Music for Children,” by Mary Richards – Embark on a musical journey around the world to meet the diverse cast of composers, musicians, and performers who are famous for making the music we love. From Johann Sebastian Bach to Billie Eilish, Hildegard of Bingen to DJ Kool Herc, Wolfgang Mozart to Miriam Makeba, musicians come from many different times and places and introduce music from a wide variety of genres. Woven into this absorbing narrative is a stellar cast of musicians, including Mozart and his sister Maria Anna, Maria Callas, Bob Dylan, Ravi and Anoushka Shankar, David Bowie, Nina Simone, Charlie Parker, Kraftwerk, John Cage, Beyonce. This book even includes a playlist of songs that you can listen to as you read.

Teens

“Passport,” by Sylvia Glock – An unforgettable graphic memoir reveals the discovery as a teenager that her parents are agents working for the CIA. Young Sophia has lived in so many different countries, she can barely keep count. Stationed now with her family in Central America because of her parents' work, Sophia feels displaced as an American living abroad, when she has hardly spent any of her life in America. Everything changes when she reads a letter she was never meant to see and uncovers her parents' secret. They are not who they say they are. They are working for the CIA. As Sophia tries to make sense of this news, and the web of lies surrounding her, she begins to question everything. The impact that this has on Sophia's emerging sense of self and understanding of the world makes for a page-turning exploration of lies and double lives.

In the hands of this extraordinary graphic storyteller, this astonishing true story bursts to life.

Adult

“Miss Me with That: Hot Takes, Helpful Tidbits, and a Few Hard Truths,” by Rachel Lindsay – Rachel Lindsay rose to prominence as The Bachelor’s first Black Bachelorette and has since become one of the franchise’s most well-known figures – and outspoken critics. But there has always been more to Lindsay than meets the eye, and in this book, she finally tells her own story, in her own words. In wide-ranging essays, Lindsay opens up about her experience on ABC’s hit show and reveals everything about her life off-camera, from a childhood growing up in Dallas, Texas, as the daughter of a U.S. District Judge, to her disastrous dating life prior to appearing on The Bachelor, to her career in law, and the decision to become a reality-TV contestant. She also brings a sharp wit and keen intellect to weigh in on issues such as the lack of diversity in reality television and the importance of political engagement, protest, and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Told in the down-to-earth, no-nonsense voice she’s become known for, Lindsay’s book of essays provides an intimate look at the life of one of reality TV’s most beloved stars, as well as advice and inspiration that will make her a role model for anyone who has ever struggled to find their way in love and life.

This article originally appeared on The Repository: Stark, Summit libraries' listings for Jan. 16

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