See how the #SuperBloodMoon looked around the world

Dylan Stableford
Senior Editor
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Supermoon Lunar Eclipse

A perigee full moon, or supermoon, is seen during a total lunar eclipse behind the Colorado State Capitol Building in Denver on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Stargazers around the world were treated to a thrilling sky show late Sunday night, when a total lunar eclipse combined with a supermoon produced what social media users dubbed the #SuperBloodMoon.

According to NASA, it was the first time since 1982 a total lunar eclipse occurred on the same night of a supermoon —  a full moon at its perigee, or the point on its elliptical orbit closest to Earth, making it appear bigger than usual. And it won't happen again until 2033.

Photographers around the world captured stunning photos of the spectacle.



A few took time lapses of the lunar eclipse, which lasted more than an hour.




Many nonphotographers tried to capture the moment on their cellphones — with not-so-stunning results.




Even actual camera users were having trouble.




No matter.