Supreme Court strikes down California requirement that charities must disclose their donors

Supreme Court strikes down California requirement that charities must disclose their donors
·1 min read
supreme court
A view of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, March 15, 2019. Associated Press/Susan Walsh
  • The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a California law requiring nonprofits to disclose the names of major donors.

  • The ruling was voted 6-3 in the case Americans for Prosperity Foundation v Bonta.

  • Americans for Prosperity Foundation, a libertarian conservative political advocacy group, had said the law violated donors' privacy rights.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a California rule that forced charities to disclose the identities of their major donors.

The justices ruled 6-3 in favor of striking down the requirement.

Americans for Prosperity Foundation v Bonta centered on a California requirement that requires nonprofits to disclose identities of individuals who donated more than $5,000 in a year on IRS forms.

Americans for Prosperity Foundation, a libertarian conservative political advocacy group, first challenged the rule in 2014, saying it violated donors' privacy rights.

The foundation said earlier this year that hundreds of other organizations representing a wide range of issues have filed or signed onto "friend-of-the-court" briefs opposing California's law.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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